+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Technikon SA?

  1. #1
    RKanarek is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Camby, IN, USA
    Posts
    347

    Technikon SA?

    Greetings.

    While in search of purveyors of distance BSEE'ish course work/degrees, I came across Technikon SA's (http://www.tsa.ac.za/) blurb in The Book (15th edition).

    Questions:
    1) Has Dr. Bear deceived me? The good doctor has described TSA as offering engineering degrees (among others), but the EE related offerings *seem* more Technology related. Who's right: my suspicions or our doctor?

    2) Technikon SA offers the following electronics degrees (degrees may be the wrong term over there, but I'm over here so I'll use it <g>):
    National Diploma, B Tech, M Tech,
    D Tech: Engineering : Electrical/Electronic
    Could anyone explain these degrees in a way that I, as an American, would understand? <g> Also, and importantly, which -- if any -- would include BSEE comparable engineering class work? That is, which -- if any -- would teach calculus based electronics courses, etc. (I do not care at all if any of the previous offering lack the excelsior [general education requirements, etc.] that a traditional, residential American BSEE would offer.)

    3) Would anyone care expound on the history , status, and prospects of Technikon SA? Am I correct in assuming that it is roughly equivalent to an American RA college (although I'll know more after someone answers question #1 <g>)?


    Thanks in advance!
    Richard Kanarek

    All in all, I find doing the school work far easier and more enjoyable than selecting the school itself.

  2. #2
    Rich Douglas is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    9,760
    Bears' Guide is a reference book, a static one at that. It would be difficult for any guide to "slice and dice" the field to the level of detail you seek. It pointed you to, among others, TSA. Then you explored the degree programs the school offered. From there, you can determine if they are for you. What difference does it make whether BG 15 accurately differentiated between an EE degree and one in EET? You can take it from there yourself.

    The Technikon of South Africa is one of the largest schools in Africa delivering non-residential instruction. The technikons are like British polytechnics. They're tertiary institutions, on par with universities, but offer instruction far more work-related. The degrees (BTech, MTech, and DTech) are not unique to South Africa's system.

    I suspect the engineering degrees would be more like EET than EE.

    TSA is merging with another South African institution (UNISA?). There is a proposal to "universitize" the technikons as well.

    A bachelor's degree from a technikon is roughly comparable to one from a university, but more practically oriented and work-related.

  3. #3
    Jack Tracey is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,093

    Re: Technikon SA?

    Originally posted by RKanarek


    3) Would anyone care expound on the history, status, and prospects of Technikon SA? Am I correct in assuming that it is roughly equivalent to an American RA college
    As Rich stated, this school is in a pre-merger state. It will be interesting to see the result in both institutions. I have some sense that the realities of the post-meger megaschool are far from clear. It's possible that curriculum offerings could shift dramatically and that a program that appears to be more EET oriented now could become more EE oriented at some time in the future. Ideally, both would be offered. BTW, I know there was some ongoing questions about the post-merger name of UNISA. Has this been settled?
    Jack

  4. #4
    RKanarek is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Camby, IN, USA
    Posts
    347
    Dear Dr, Douglas & Mr. Tracey:

    Greetings, and thank you BOTH for the replies!

    Dr. Duglas, regarding your reply:
    "Bears' Guide is a reference book, a static one at that. It would be difficult for any guide to "slice and dice" the field to the level of detail you seek. It pointed you to, among others, TSA. Then you explored the degree programs the school offered. From there, you can determine if they are for you. What difference does it make whether BG 15 accurately differentiated between an EE degree and one in EET? You can take it from there yourself."

    In your initial paragraph, you explained to me how a book works, and that I can make up for a book's deficiencies myself. Even if I didn't know you were formerly an Air Force officer, I could have guessed that you have suckled on the federal/municipal teat at some point. <g> There is something about those who have been, or (heaven help them) are meant to be, part of large (additional adjectives omitted) bureaucracies that distinguishes them from normal people. <g> I desperately hope that I can escape federal servitude before it happens to me, assuming it hasn't already.

    I might add that my playful jab at The Book was meant merely as a rhetorical device. I would, of course, never seriously impugn The Book. I'm familiar with the first book of the Divine Comedy; I wouldn't chance it. <g>


    "The technikons are like British polytechnics. They're tertiary institutions, on par with universities, but offer instruction far more work-related. The degrees (BTech, MTech, and DTech) are not unique to South Africa's system."

    I suspected that there were similarities between the British and SA educational systems, but (surprisingly) I am not well versed in "tertiary instructions" or "British Polytechnics." Before posting, I tried doing some research on the internet. I found references to NDCs and NDHs, but no National Degrees (period). As sparse as the information I could find on NDs was, I could find even less about Btech.

    Are BTech, MTech, DTech types of National Diplomas or are National Diplomas yet another type of degree? I am working under the possibly flawed assumption that BTech ~ BS, MTech ~ Masters, and DTech ~ PhD, but I can't conceive of a BSEET being extended to the Masters or PhD level. (In my day <g>, an ET degree was a two-year degree.)

    An explanation (by anyone) of SA degree terminology would certainly be helpful. Further, while I think Dr. Douglas is quite right in suggesting that the Technikon degrees that I was considering were more EET (technology) related than EE (engineering ) related, additional information from anyone familiar with Technikon SA would also be welcome.


    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek

  5. #5
    Jack Tracey is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,093
    I'm sorry to be the one who has to tell you, but my guess is that no one really knows the answers to your questions. There are very few of us who have ventured into the realm of South African degrees and I don't recall any of them being in the engineering /technology area(s). The silver lining to that cloud is that you could make yourself the degreeinfo resident expert in South African DL engineering /tech degrees simply by researching your own interests. You could start here:
    http://education.pwv.gov.za/Edu_Rela...er?unitech.htm
    fair winds,
    Jack

  6. #6
    Dennis Ruhl is offline member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,790
    Ask oxpecker.






    .

  7. #7
    Rich Douglas is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    9,760
    Regarding Bears' Guide, I was just pointing out that it is a starting point, not a finishing one. Although it gets you in the neighboorhood, it takes a lot more reserach on your own to find the program(s) you want.

    IIRC, National Diplomas are like certificates: above high school, below college degrees.

    I referenced the British polytechnics for the very reason there would be more information about them, information that would be helpful in understanding the technikons.

    I suspect the technikons are going to be extinct, turned into universities.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    wfready is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Anna, Texas (outside DFW).
    Posts
    647
    RKanarek,

    This is my impression of these BTECH MTECH degrees (its just a guess so take it for what it's worth):

    I went on the website for these programs and they had the degree names but no curriculum (did you find one?), so I can't know for sure. I think the US schools separate these two types of degrees (BSE vs. BSET) more than any other country. I think in other countries a BTech and a BSEng are a little more similar in structure than an American BSE and BSET. Perhaps, the BTech is a little more "applied" in nature than a typical engineering degree; but, I am guessing that it is not as applied as a US engineering technology degree.

    I know what you mean about wondering what would be in a masters degree in engineer technology (it doesn't take a graduate education to troubleshoot right?). This is what makes me believe that there is a lot more theory involved in these foreign technology degrees. Also, do a google search on BTech & resume. Then, do a google on BSET & resume. Notice that more BTech grads have more engineering work experience and the BSET grads have more engineering technician/field service engineer type experience?

    So, maybe a BTech and BSET isn't the same..

    Best Regards,
    Bill
    Last edited by wfready; 07-14-2003 at 02:55 PM.

  10. #9
    wfready is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Anna, Texas (outside DFW).
    Posts
    647
    Hey Richard,

    I found the curriculum guide for Btech in electronic engineering . Definately SOUNDS like a technology degree. Can't really tell though for sure because of the non-descriptive course titles like "mathematics I, II, or III"... Definately seems like a technologist's degree (lots of courses on current technologies like optoelectronics, and controls).

    It's hard to say in a foreign degree what the heck they are teaching because of how they word the curriculum list.

    //Bill

  11. #10
    RKanarek is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Camby, IN, USA
    Posts
    347
    Dear Bill:

    Thanks for replying! I'm glad that you were able to find Technikon SA's engineering degree descriptions (http://www.tsa.ac.za/corp/academic/eng/eng2003.pdf).

    Yesterday, I wrote one of the contact names given for the "engineering " program, and I almost immediately received as courteous & pleasant a reply as I could have wished. In the interests of propriety, I shall not post the sender's name nor his entire reply; I'll only quote the relevant bit.


    Regarding SA educational terminology:
    B Eng (Baccalaureus Engineeriae) (not sure about the spelling). This is a degree in Electrical Engineering obtained at a University (Highest educational institution).
    The B Tech is just "below" the B Eng.
    B Eng: emphasis is on solving engineering problems (mostly theoretical)
    National Diploma and B Tech: emphasis is on the practical work

    National Diploma and B Tech are done at a Technikon (where the emphasis is on the practical experience and students have to do about 1 year experiential training in industry which is not the case at a University).
    Of course, as you mentioned, this does not explain the M Tech & D Tech degrees. I find the existence of a US BSEET hard to understand (ET was a two year degree in my day); the existance of graduate level technology degree boggles (what's left of) my mind. I shall consider making further enquiries.

    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek

    Addendum: With regard to The Book, which christened Technikon as an Engineering degree provider, and the many forum members who supply links to BSEET providers when BSEE questions are asked, may I point out that this is not helpful. If you would not direct someone who desires a graduate degree in literature or theology to a library or church, respectively, merely because they are related, then it is equally improper to commingle more technical subjects. I certainly hope that, at least, future editions of The Book will separate engineering from technology.

  12. #11
    Mike Albrecht is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,476
    Perhaps an example from the US might help. In some schools (I have not done a count, but I did research around 20 different programs during my search for a PhD program) there is a marked difference between engineering and technology, often with them being in different departments and sometimes in different schools.

    A good example of the last is NCA&T which specifically separeats the progrmas.

    You can get a bachelors, masters, and doctorate in either engineering or technology (note the technology doctorate is part of the Indiana State PhD Consrtium).

  13. #12
    wfready is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Anna, Texas (outside DFW).
    Posts
    647
    Richard,

    This my take on 2 year, 4 year, and 6 year degrees in technology:

    2 year - AAS, AS in Electronics , Technology, Engineering Technology, etc. Exclusively hands-on (enough theory is taught to understand circuits so you can fix them). A technicians degree.

    4 year - BS in Engineering Technology, Electronics , Technology, etc. First 2 years same as above; the last 2 years have more theory and some design (circuit analysis, statics, etc.). So, they can build circuits (based on engineering designs), perform more complex troublshooting (failure analysis). The typical roles of a technologist.

    6 year - MS in Electronics Technology - coursework involves more systems technology and management (next logical step up for an ET grad is management )

    Beyond - same thing accept harder :D

    Check this out:

    MS in Computer and Electronics Technology

    Mostly systems analysis and management stuff. Cheap too. I know you are interested in a double EE; but, just to show you ET grads are not doomed to either an MBA or a MSCS degree if they want to continue their education :D.


    Best Regards,
    Bill

  14. #13
    RKanarek is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Camby, IN, USA
    Posts
    347
    Gentlemen:

    Thank you both for taking the time to post and prove me a liar (when I said, possibly not here, that there weren't any such a thing as Masters in Technology). <g>

    Clearly, the world is far more insane that ever I thought. This is extremely frightening, as I have long suspected it as being very insane indeed.

    A masters or doctorate in technology? Incredible!


    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15