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Thread: DPA vs. DCJ?

  1. #33
    fakescholars is offline member
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    You're stuck here. Forever.

    And now that you are our prisoner, we will laugh at you. Again. And again.

    Face it, dude, you are a shill for a degree mill. And you got caught at it.

    You even threaten like a degree mill shill.

    So we laugh at you one more time.

    Bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha!

    So there.

  2. #34
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Chrisjm18, you are correct. For example, the University of South Florida has two different MA tracks at the graduate level:

    MA Criminal Justice (practitioner based)
    MA in Criminal Justice Administration | USF Criminology

    MA Criminology (theory & methodology based)
    MA in Criminology | USF Criminology
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

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  3. #35
    chrisjm18 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanantone View Post
    Those are the differences in theory, but not the differences in practice. Anyway, the person who wrote that article is clueless. People with criminology degrees don't go on to become criminal psychologists and private investigators. They get the same jobs CJ majors get, most of which, don't even require a degree.
    What do you have to say about this?

    https://online.ccj.pdx.edu/news-reso...l-justice.html

    Occasionally, criminology and criminal justice incorrectly treated interchangeably in public forums. Despite certain shared characteristics, the two areas of study differ in several ways. Criminology is by definition the study of crime. It’s a social science that shares characteristics with sociology . Criminologists are “question askers” and information seekers, always searching for the reason behind why crimes are committed and how they can be prevented in the future. Criminology involves extensive research and analysis, and ideally that research and analysis helps create more appropriate and effective social responses to crime.

    Criminal justice , on the other hand, is more closely focused on how the law is made and enforcement and how punishment is carried out. It examines the workings of the justice system at all stages, from the moment a crime is detected, to police, to the courts, and all the way through corrections. More simply, criminal justice studies center on what happens after a crime is committed and how the legal system functions in legislating, enforcing laws, punishing offenders, responding to victims, and ultimately impacts crime.
    M.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Lamar University (2018, expected)
    MBA in General Management - Assam Don Bosco University (2016)
    B.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Ashworth College (2014)
    AAS in Security Management - Ashworth College (2012)

    "Whether you say I can or I can't, you're right either way."

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  5. #36
    chrisjm18 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by me again View Post
    Chrisjm18, you are correct. For example, the University of South Florida has two different MA tracks at the graduate level:

    MA Criminal Justice (practitioner based)
    MA in Criminal Justice Administration | USF Criminology

    MA Criminology (theory & methodology based)
    MA in Criminology | USF Criminology
    Good reference. There are several universities, especially in the UK that offer both criminal justice and criminology degrees.
    M.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Lamar University (2018, expected)
    MBA in General Management - Assam Don Bosco University (2016)
    B.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Ashworth College (2014)
    AAS in Security Management - Ashworth College (2012)

    "Whether you say I can or I can't, you're right either way."

  6. #37
    sanantone is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisjm18 View Post
    What do you have to say about this?

    https://online.ccj.pdx.edu/news-reso...l-justice.html

    Occasionally, criminology and criminal justice incorrectly treated interchangeably in public forums. Despite certain shared characteristics, the two areas of study differ in several ways. Criminology is by definition the study of crime. It’s a social science that shares characteristics with sociology . Criminologists are “question askers” and information seekers, always searching for the reason behind why crimes are committed and how they can be prevented in the future. Criminology involves extensive research and analysis, and ideally that research and analysis helps create more appropriate and effective social responses to crime.

    Criminal justice, on the other hand, is more closely focused on how the law is made and enforcement and how punishment is carried out. It examines the workings of the justice system at all stages, from the moment a crime is detected, to police, to the courts, and all the way through corrections. More simply, criminal justice studies center on what happens after a crime is committed and how the legal system functions in legislating, enforcing laws, punishing offenders, responding to victims, and ultimately impacts crime.
    My criminal justice program is like the first paragraph that describes criminology programs. However, it is a PhD program. It's supposed to be research-oriented. That's why I said the differences are almost non-existent at the doctoral level.
    Texas State University - PhD CJ (ABD)
    Angelo State University - Master of Security Studies and Grad Cert Terrorism
    Thomas Edison State College/University - BA Soc Sci, AAS in Environmental Safety, ASNSM in Biology, & BSBA in CIS

  7. #38
    sanantone is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by me again View Post
    Chrisjm18, you are correct. For example, the University of South Florida has two different MA tracks at the graduate level:

    MA Criminal Justice (practitioner based)
    MA in Criminal Justice Administration | USF Criminology

    MA Criminology (theory & methodology based)
    MA in Criminology | USF Criminology
    That's not a criminal justice program. That's a criminal justice administration program. That's like comparing political science to public administration .
    Texas State University - PhD CJ (ABD)
    Angelo State University - Master of Security Studies and Grad Cert Terrorism
    Thomas Edison State College/University - BA Soc Sci, AAS in Environmental Safety, ASNSM in Biology, & BSBA in CIS

  8. #39
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by me again View Post
    Chrisjm18, you are correct. For example, the University of South Florida has two different MA tracks at the graduate level:

    MA Criminal Justice (practitioner based)
    MA in Criminal Justice Administration | USF Criminology

    MA Criminology (theory & methodology based)
    MA in Criminology | USF Criminology

    Quote Originally Posted by sanantone View Post
    That's not a criminal justice program. That's a criminal justice administration program. That's like comparing political science to public administration.
    It most certainly is a criminal justice program. The only reason "administration" was added is because colleagues asked for it to be inserted during the developmental stage. "Administration" was added for vanity and marketing , to be frank. Otherwise, it would only be listed as criminal justice.
    Last edited by me again; 12-05-2017 at 06:06 PM. Reason: MAGA!
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

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  9. #40
    sanantone is offline Registered User
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    It requires administration and finance courses. Those aren't common requirements in CJ programs. This looks like a public administration program marketed to criminal justice professionals, so the name is appropriate.
    Last edited by sanantone; 12-05-2017 at 07:43 PM.
    Texas State University - PhD CJ (ABD)
    Angelo State University - Master of Security Studies and Grad Cert Terrorism
    Thomas Edison State College/University - BA Soc Sci, AAS in Environmental Safety, ASNSM in Biology, & BSBA in CIS

  10. #41
    dlbb is offline Registered User
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    Present arguments aside, I think one might argue that the DCJ could have value for the holder, for purposes of advancement in academia, if the holder also had good publications. The degree may be an unknown commodity in terms of its potential value, but if a holder had decent publications on their curriculum vitae, I think it would be a moot point. Absent any publications, then the degree's merits would more likely be questioned in an academic environment. I'm not so sure that a CC would make that distinction though.

    In general, I think a person with a DCJ and publications would be far more likely to be hired than a DPA and CJ-related specialization and no publications at a 4 year school. At the CC level, there will not be as much expectation for publications, so teaching experience, a willingness to adapt to and thrive in the unique cc environment, previous experience in law enforcement (as practitioners), would be most helpful. One or two publications could set you apart, but ultimately may not matter too much at the CC level. CC's are looking for good teachers , not researchers who will regularly publish. It all depends upon the type of environment in which you hope to teach at.

    If you hope to teach at a 4-year and do not plan to publish, then you probably could be a lecturer or instructor, and a DPA may be better if it has a dissertation and a DCJ does not.
    Last edited by dlbb; 12-05-2017 at 10:45 PM.

  11. #42
    chrisjm18 is offline Registered User
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    dlbb,

    Thank you for steering the conversation back in the right direction :)

    I appreciate your feedback. I already applied for the D.CJ. program because my goal is to teach at a 2-year school so a doctorate more than likely won't be required. I am not opposed to teaching at a 4-year school as an instructor or lecturer. I just don't have any interest in publishing as it is now. I am very passionate about alternatives to juvenile detention/incarceration so that might be an area that I would like to do some advanced research on.
    M.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Lamar University (2018, expected)
    MBA in General Management - Assam Don Bosco University (2016)
    B.Sc. in Criminal Justice - Ashworth College (2014)
    AAS in Security Management - Ashworth College (2012)

    "Whether you say I can or I can't, you're right either way."

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  13. #43
    dlbb is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisjm18 View Post
    dlbb,

    Thank you for steering the conversation back in the right direction :)

    I appreciate your feedback. I already applied for the D.CJ. program because my goal is to teach at a 2-year school so a doctorate more than likely won't be required. I am not opposed to teaching at a 4-year school as an instructor or lecturer. I just don't have any interest in publishing as it is now. I am very passionate about alternatives to juvenile detention/incarceration so that might be an area that I would like to do some advanced research on.
    A program with a dissertation would more likely teach doctoral level writing and research, which would help more with potentially publishing. If you go with a more practitioner-based degree that lacks that element, you may not be exposed to that kind of learning that provides you with the skills and knowledge to do that successfully. That's not to say you couldn't learn it on your own. :-)

    And, to contradict myself, you potentially could go farther than a lecturer or instructor at a 4-year school with a DCJ and not publishing. It really depends on the school, location, your competition, the value placed on publishing by the school, etc. I do think either would serve you well at a CC. As with many careers, experience matters, so you will want to get that first teaching experience, more likely than not as an adjunct. A lot of people who go to traditional schools get that experience as graduate students, as TAs.

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