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Thread: Composites

  1. #1
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    Composites

    C'mon, you can be honest with me. I know your passion is composite materials. So you'll be delighted to learn that now there's a youtube channel, just for you.

    CFM launches eLearning YouTube channel
    American College of Sports Medicine

  2. #2
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    I can hardly wait. History of Polyester, Return to Rayon... the possibilities are endless.
    Now where did I put my flared-pants leisure suit?

    J.

  3. #3
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    I'm thinking more about carbon fiber racing bike frames.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  4. #4
    heirophant is offline Registered User
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    Composite materials are huge in engineering , especially aerospace, because they are extremely strong while being lighter than most metals. Another advantage in military applications is that composites have less radar reflectivity than metals. Modern aircraft, both military and commercial, are increasingly made out of composite materials.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composite_material

  5. #5
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Right. -- Silly me. I thought for no good reason this was all about textiles. Obviously not. Important, for sure.

    J.

  6. #6
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    Textiles can be important too but how about a carbon fiber Mustang?

    Carbon Fiber S550: Yes, this is the real thing!
    American College of Sports Medicine

  7. #7
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    A car that won't die of body-rust. Excellent. I can remember maybe 60 years ago or more, you could get a car with a rust-free body. A Bentley Continental Mk VI in stainless steel. Heavier - and Bentleys cost more than Ford Mustangs. Maybe one of each...

    Both are better options than fiberglass etc. A work-buddy once had a '50s Corvette backfire through the carburetor and burn totally at a stoplight. Total loss - he escaped unhurt; bought another old Corvette that he kept for 30 years. He loved those cars...

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 08-27-2017 at 09:11 AM.

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  9. #8
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johann
    I can remember maybe 60 years ago or more, you could get a car with a rust-free body. A Bentley Continental Mk VI in stainless steel.
    Considering I read about it as a little kid, in the popular "Eagle" weekly comic, around 1949-50, I didn't do too badly. It turns out car was a Mk VI - but not a Continental. That series didn't start production until 1952. The Mk VI model was produced from 1946-52. The stainless steel version I read about must have been a coachbuilder's special. The base ones were known as "standard steel" and their one weakness was the inferior steel generally available in the UK during early postwar years.

    The basic car cost around £4,500 ($5,820 US now) - very expensive for the times. Probably 7+ years of income for a skilled tradesman. IIRC (and I might not) the stainless version cost £6,000 ($7,760 US now). I was maybe 6 or 7 and was quite excited to read about this amazing car - light years beyond the Morrises, Austins, Hillmans etc. that I saw every day. I remember thinking "Wow! So this is why they made me learn to read!"

    Here's a page on the Mk VI with some nice pics. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bentley_Mark_VI Times have changed - just a bit. I hear a Bentley starts at over $180K US these days and can go much higher.

    J.

    PS - It was likely 1950 when I read about the car. The Eagle comic wasn't around in '49, they say. (It started in 1950.) May even have been 1951 when I read about the car - but definitely no later.
    Last edited by Johann; 08-28-2017 at 12:43 PM.

  10. #9
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    I once saw photos of a stainless steel Checker cab that operated in NYC. I saw the photos maybe 10 years ago but I believe the cab was older than that.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  11. #10
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    I saw the photos maybe 10 years ago but I believe the cab was older than that.
    It would have to be WAY older than that. The last Checker vehicles were produced in 1982 -35 years ago. The company filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in 2009 - 27 years after it quit making complete cars. A re-configured version of the company had been making Cadillac components for GM, among other things.

    From 1958-82, Checker also sold cars to the public, including a station wagon variant. I think they were great, practical cars. A friend had one. Many, including his, were powered by an ultra-reliable 6-cylinder Chevy 250. Others by the indestructible 350 V-8. Like tanks - all of 'em!

    Whole interesting story of the company here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checke...rs_Corporation

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 08-28-2017 at 04:36 PM.

  12. #11
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    PS - I just learned that tooling from the closed Checker site in Kalamazoo MI was bought by GM and is used here in Canada for production of the Buick LaCrosse.

    J.

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