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  1. #1
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    African elearning Providers

    American College of Sports Medicine

  2. #2
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  3. #3
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Heiks View Post
    This page cannot be displayed.
    I see it mostly fine, with a few missing images. Interesting stuff!
    BS, Info Sys concentration, Charter Oak State College
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    More at http://stevefoerster.com

  4. #4
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    I wasn't too impressed. I tried to skip the ones that were high school level. I then went to the sites I found relevant (no links from the article.) I found Kotivu.ng lacked material in business fundamentals - accounting , etc. while it had had a lot of material on "soft" skills - negotiation, selling etc. Ecampus was quite well set-up for math, etc. First look reminded me of Khan Academy - but Khan Academy is free, and ECampus costs money. And there's a lot more on Khan Academy!

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 06-20-2017 at 02:32 PM.

  5. #5
    decimon is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johann View Post
    I wasn't too impressed. I tried to skip the ones that were high school level.
    J.

    High school level is what's most needed. Promoting higher education will in too many cases be putting the cart before the horse. The horse is economic policy that allows for growing business that creates jobs.

    Without worthwhile jobs, the best college graduates will join the brain drain to more developed nations.

  6. #6
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by decimon View Post
    High school level is what's most needed. Promoting higher education will in too many cases be putting the cart before the horse. The horse is economic policy that allows for growing business that creates jobs.

    Without worthwhile jobs, the best college graduates will join the brain drain to more developed nations.
    I think this is entirely accurate. When you look at African universities' DL offerings one thing that is completely true is they are trying to promote Bachelors in Education degrees. They want teachers . Elementary and high school teachers are needed virtually everywhere across the continent.
    Last edited by Kizmet; 06-20-2017 at 04:33 PM.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  7. #7
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by decimon
    High school level is what's most needed. Promoting higher education will in too many cases be putting the cart before the horse.
    Agreed. 100%. I totally missed the point by not thinking in terms of African requirements; too Johann-centric.

    Very important for Africa. Not so much for Johann. High School - done 57 years ago. Sorry.

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 06-20-2017 at 04:44 PM.

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  9. #8
    decimon is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    I think this is entirely accurate. When you look at African universities' DL offerings one thing that is completely true is they are trying to promote Bachelors in Education degrees. They want teachers. Elementary and high school teachers are needed virtually everywhere across the continent.

    If there's a need for teachers then there is so that would be appropriate.

    One qualm in my craw, if such can be, is that I'd prefer not generic, all-purpose teachers but specialist teachers .

  10. #9
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by decimon View Post
    ...I'd prefer not generic, all-purpose teachers but specialist teachers.
    I understand that, but when you've got a lot of ground to cover, many, many students in rural areas (and even more coming along) -- and have to make things work quickly, you have to resort to less-than-ideal teaching conditions. Generalists now - to promote literacy, math skills (and vocational training as possible) - specialists once you've got at least adequate coverage of the basics. Horse before cart.

    J.

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