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  1. #1
    nyvrem is offline Registered User
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    HES has increased their course fees to $1550 for UG & $2700 for grad classes.

    Tuition cost
    • $1,550 for undergraduate courses
    • $2,700 for graduate courses
    https://www.extension.harvard.edu/re...ion-admissions


  2. #2
    AlK11 is offline Registered User
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    That's a 23% increase in only 2 years. Ridiculously absurd.
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  3. #3
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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  4. #4
    b4cz28 is offline Registered User
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    In reality as a non-profit Harvard could easily make these courses free. Just using some of the 58 million they paid the money managers could do that. Also, the profits from the 35 Billion could fund most students for free. There are zero reasons for schools to get super wealthy like this as non-profits. They are making a huge profit, more than most major corporations will ever make.
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  5. #5
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by b4cz28 View Post
    In reality as a non-profit Harvard could easily make these courses free. Just using some of the 58 million they paid the money managers could do that. Also, the profits from the 35 Billion could fund most students for free. There are zero reasons for schools to get super wealthy like this as non-profits. They are making a huge profit, more than most major corporations will ever make.
    To be fair, they also say that 100% of their students can graduate debt-free and 20% of their students pay nothing at all.

    https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid
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  6. #6
    John Bear is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    $58 million paid to investment advisors. Hey, I would have done it for $79. Everything into tax-free municipals. Oh, and, I guess, plastics.
    Last edited by John Bear; 06-14-2017 at 06:54 AM.
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  7. #7
    TEKMAN is offline Semper Fi!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    To be fair, they also say that 100% of their students can graduate debt-free and 20% of their students pay nothing at all.

    https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid
    That is true, but getting into Harvard College is an extremely slim chance. Therefore, these schools try to scoop the money from those who work and/or going to Ivy Leauge Schools through the backdoor. :)
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  9. #8
    cookderosa is offline Resident Chef
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    Quote Originally Posted by b4cz28 View Post
    In reality as a non-profit Harvard could easily make these courses free. Just using some of the 58 million they paid the money managers could do that. Also, the profits from the 35 Billion could fund most students for free. There are zero reasons for schools to get super wealthy like this as non-profits. They are making a huge profit, more than most major corporations will ever make.
    Offering for free devalues their brand in a BIG way. They have already removed the admissions hurdles, and it's a tiny fraction of what they charge for their other programs.
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  10. #9
    Bruce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bear View Post
    $58 million paid to investment advisors. Hey, I would have done it for $79. Everything into tax-free municipals. Oh, and, I guess, plastics.
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  11. #10
    Bruce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookderosa View Post
    Offering for free devalues their brand in a BIG way. They have already removed the admissions hurdles, and it's a tiny fraction of what they charge for their other programs.
    I've mentioned before that, being from the area, I know many, many people who have taken HES courses, but only a few who have actually graduated with a degree. I think Harvard keeps their brand up by keeping the graduation requirements very difficult, and I see HES as a cash cow for the university.
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  12. #11
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
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    Well, I've got mixed feelings about it. On the one hand I'd say that with a shmillion dollar endowment they don't really need a cash cow. But on the other hand, with a shmillion dollar endowment they could certainly afford to offer the HES courses more cheaply. Personally I'd like to see the prices go down, not up.
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  13. #12
    Bruce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    Well, I've got mixed feelings about it. On the one hand I'd say that with a shmillion dollar endowment they don't really need a cash cow. But on the other hand, with a shmillion dollar endowment they could certainly afford to offer the HES courses more cheaply. Personally I'd like to see the prices go down, not up.
    Harvard can be incredibly cheap. I have a friend on the campus police, and the school not only stonewalled them for a raise several years ago, they were actually talking about layoffs.

    Then Virginia Tech happened, and suddenly safety was a priority again, but I think Harvard can afford to have the best trained, best equipped, and best paid college police department in the country.
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  14. #13
    cookderosa is offline Resident Chef
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce View Post
    I've mentioned before that, being from the area, I know many, many people who have taken HES courses, but only a few who have actually graduated with a degree. I think Harvard keeps their brand up by keeping the graduation requirements very difficult, and I see HES as a cash cow for the university.

    How many people are willing to pay $2700 to put Harvard on their resume? A ton I'd imagine. You don't even need the whole degree. Still, $27,000 buys the master's -- pretty good deal imo.
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  15. #14
    AlK11 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookderosa View Post
    How many people are willing to pay $2700 to put Harvard on their resume? A ton I'd imagine. You don't even need the whole degree. Still, $27,000 buys the master's -- pretty good deal imo.
    A ton would pay $50000 or $100000 for a Harvard degree as well. Going up 5000 in two years is ridiculous and I wouldn't pay it. Lots of other options to choose from. I was on the fence when it was $22000 for the degree two years ago and just fell off of it. It's unfortunate too because as already mentioned, it doesn't have to be that high, and the programs themselves are interesting.
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  17. #15
    heirophant is offline Registered User
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    I don't think that offering a program for free will damage the brand, provided that the admissions selectivity and academic reputation are there.

    It certainly doesn't seem to diminish the brand at the more prestigious doctoral programs, which offer admitted students free tuition plus a stipend (often in the $30-35,000 range) plus health insurance and various other perks like laptops, books, journal subscriptions and conference travel expenses. Some even throw in housing.

    For example:

    https://www.sloankettering.edu/gerst...ns/fellowships

    https://philosophy.stanford.edu/degr...ancial-support

    https://gsas.harvard.edu/financial-support/funding-aid

    If Harvard's reason for operating the HES is to bring Harvard education to the broader community, then charging what the market will bear for the "Harvard" name (and hence pricing themselves beyond many people's reach) would seem to be a self-contradictory strategy.
    Last edited by heirophant; 06-15-2017 at 11:03 AM.

  18. #16
    Stanislav is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirophant View Post
    I don't think that offering a program for free will damage the brand, provided that the admissions selectivity and academic reputation are there.

    I'm thinking of many of the more prestigious doctoral programs, often (but not always) in the sciences, which offer admitted students free tuition plus a stipend (often in the $30-35,000 range) plus health insurance and various other perks like laptops, books, journal subscriptions and conference travel expenses. Some even throw in housing.

    For example:

    https://www.sloankettering.edu/gerst...ns/fellowships

    https://philosophy.stanford.edu/degr...ancial-support

    https://gsas.harvard.edu/financial-support/funding-aid
    If you add academic selectivity, it would not be an Extension School, now would it? The goal of both HES and online education has been expanding access; "selectivity" is almost by definition the opposite.
    Traditional doctoral programs are entirely different animal. Most of these provide generous financial aid, be it a stipend or an assistantship position - including at Harvard. Usually the more prestigious and selective the program, the better the support package (field specific of course). No one would sign up for exceedingly long programs with uncertain employment prospects otherwise.
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