+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 217
  1. #1
    saharapost is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    173

    Breaking News-Nationsuniversity withdraws DETC Accreditation

    I just got an email now from the university stating reasons for it. I will include link soon. I am on phone at the moment. Please pardon my headline- ought to have read withdraws DETC accreditation application
    Last edited by saharapost; 07-01-2013 at 12:49 PM.

  2. #2
    saharapost is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    173
    It is painful to read that NU withdrew its application. While it may be understandable that they had to do so at this moment, those of us who were looking forward to the good news got disappointed. The only conclusion one can make at this juncture is that, getting DETC is not as easy as most RA institutions make it sound. The mail reads in part:
    ''On another note, we want to bring you up to date regarding our efforts to gain accreditation. Due to an unexpected development with a State authority, NU withdrew its application for accreditation with a national accrediting commission. NU officials believe all requirements had been satisfied for accreditation, yet the last obstacle could not be resolved by the deadline imposed by the accrediting commission. We regret having to take the action, but it was the best action at this time. The NU Board of Regents is accessing the next step, which should be published soon.''
    More info in the attached link: email : Webview : NU Encouragement July 13

  3. #3
    LearningAddict is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    891
    Doggone it! :-(

  4. #4
    CalDog is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,647
    NationsUniversity has been disappointing people for years when it comes to accreditation. For example, the following post was made by a different poster in a different degreeinfo thread back in November of 2009:

    NationsUniversity has been talking about getting national accreditation for way over a year now. In fact, it goes way back to 2007.

    I don't doubt that NationsUniversity has great intentions, but how does it take a school so long to prepare an application and to make the necessary adjustments to be considered for national accreditation with the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC)?

    It is fine to have someone that is willing to work for you and prepare, but it seems more than obvious that it is taking a long period of time to prepare for this accreditation, and how does NationsUniversity know whether or not it can be considered for national accreditation when it doesn't even do the initial part of doing the application process?

    That's why I think the school has good intentions, but if it has been this long for them to seek national accreditation, and they can't fill out a simple application and get the ball rolling it seems highly unlikely they will go through with the process.

  5. #5
    saharapost is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by CalDog View Post
    NationsUniversity has been disappointing people for years when it comes to accreditation. For example, the following post was made by a different poster in a different degreeinfo thread back in November of 2009:
    I wouldn't think NU would not want to get the accreditation. But truth be told, it has been a long ride on the accreditation process and they ought to have got it by now. I think there is some sense(s) in the post you dug out- if NU had fought tooth and nail for the accreditation, they would've conquered all the obstacles that have been knocking them off for many years...

  6. #6
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    At the risk of being "cynical me," I have to wonder if this is just another school that is perpetually "a candidate for accreditation" as a way of attracting students and yet never really has any intention/ability of following through.

    At it's most positive Nations is a great experiment. I'd like to see it succeed but at this juncture shouldn't we be at least moderately skeptical?
    American College of Sports Medicine

  7. #7
    Ian Anderson is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    5,074
    In the USA religious schools do not need accreditation to operate legally (as long as 'fraud' is not involved). But accreditation always helps atract students.

    \

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Ottawa County, Ohio
    Posts
    13,352
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Anderson View Post
    In the USA religious schools do not need accreditation to operate legally (as long as 'fraud' is not involved).
    For that matter, in the USA secular schools do not need accreditation to operate legally.
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  10. #9
    Rich Douglas is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    11,356
    Quote Originally Posted by amnestylaw View Post
    The only conclusion one can make at this juncture is that, getting DETC is not as easy as most RA institutions make it sound.
    It's one conclusion, but not the only one available.

    Einstein tried to get us to understand that motion is relative. There is no special place one can stand still and observe the universe. This is relative, too. So, one conclusion is that DETC is harder than it's made out to be. Another is that this applicant wasn't even worthy of DETC's recognition.

    Which is right? Probably both.

  11. #10
    Rich Douglas is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    11,356
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Anderson View Post
    In the USA religious schools do not need accreditation to operate legally (as long as 'fraud' is not involved). But accreditation always helps atract students.
    Aren't there some states that require schools to become accredited?

  12. #11
    LGFlood is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Decatur, AL
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Anderson View Post
    In the USA religious schools do not need accreditation to operate legally (as long as 'fraud' is not involved). But accreditation always helps atract students.
    That may be the case, but I would challenge anyone looking to obtain a legitimate ministry position without an accredited degree. Frankly, in most churches or parachurch organizations, I would think it would be more advantageous to have no degree at all (and have a lot of ministry experience) than to have an unaccredited degree. I have found that most unaccredited online degree programs in the area of religious studies are nothing more than mills. Please note I said most, not all.
    Lance G. Flood

    A.A., B.S., M.A. - Liberty University
    M.A. - Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary (In Progress)

    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lancegflood
    Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/lancegflood
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lancegflood

  13. #12
    LearningAddict is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    891
    Though I am disappointed as I really want to see a free tuition university of this kind obtain accreditation, I'm not surprised by the outcome. I actually stated resigning to the idea that NU wouldn't get accredited.

    I believe they've put in a legitimate effort, and this time they've hit some kind of regulation snag that they couldn't take care of in time enough for the DETC's liking. Oh well.

    University of the People is still up AFAIK, so there is still hope. However, it is $100 per exam for students in the wealthier nations, so it's less free but still a good deal.

  14. #13
    CalDog is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,647
    Aren't there some states that require schools to become accredited?
    Yes, like Wyoming for example. In Wyoming, colleges and universities must have recognized accreditation, or be in the process of getting such accreditation. That's why Kennedy Western/Warren National went out of business -- they needed recognized accreditation to stay open in Wyoming, and they failed to get it.

    Some states exempt religious schools from such requirements. But the religious exemption is not universal in the US -- in many states (like Wyoming), religious degree-granting schools have to meet the exact same requirements as secular ones.

    In the USA religious schools do not need accreditation to operate legally
    For that matter, in the USA secular schools do not need accreditation to operate legally.
    It would be more correct to say "in some US states", rather than "in the USA".

    Saying "in the USA" may suggest that the statement applies everywhere in the USA, which is not true in this case.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2013 at 08:59 PM.

  15. #14
    CalDog is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,647
    University of the People is still up AFAIK, so there is still hope. However, it is $100 per exam for students in the wealthier nations, so it's less free but still a good deal.
    Nations now charges a $480/year "technology fee" to US residents, so it isn't exactly free either. Nations also tells US residents to budget for textbooks and for "the cost of a possible modest increase in technology fee or the addition of a tuition fee."

    The technology fee is waived if you are outside the US, or in prison. In that case, Nations is pretty much free, except for textbooks.

    I really want to see a free tuition university of this kind obtain accreditation
    How would a free-tuition university stay in business if they did obtain accreditation ?

    Suppose a school with recognized US accreditation announced a free-tuition, open-admissions policy. They would be swamped with applications instantly, from both the US and overseas. And they would lose money on every student, just like Nations does (according to Nations, "fiscal revenue from students accounts for less than 20 percent of the cost of providing the services").

    You can't lose money on every customer and stay in business. Nations is a relatively small operation, and presumably they get financial support from charitable donations and like-minded religious organizations. But if they got accreditation, they wouldn't be small any more -- their enrollment would soar immediately. And their losses would soar along with their enrollment.

    Everyone loves the idea of getting something for nothing. Unfortunately, it's not a realistic business model.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2013 at 10:14 PM.

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    LearningAddict is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    891
    Quote Originally Posted by CalDog View Post
    Nations now charges a $480/year "technology fee" to US residents, so it isn't exactly free either. Nations also tells US residents to budget for textbooks and for "the cost of a possible modest increase in technology fee or the addition of a tuition fee."
    I'm aware of the technology fee, but the school is considered "tuition-free" which as I've always understood it is why everyone refers to this model simply as "free".

    The book list I read some time ago was so cheap price-wise that it didn't appear to even be worth a worry at all for the majority of students.

    Quote Originally Posted by CalDog View Post
    How would a free-tuition university stay in business if they did obtain accreditation ?

    Suppose a school with recognized US accreditation announced a free-tuition, open-admissions policy. They would be swamped with applications instantly, from both the US and overseas. And they would lose money on every student, just like Nations does (according to Nations, "fiscal revenue from students accounts for less than 20 percent of the cost of providing the services").

    You can't lose money on every customer and stay in business. Nations is a relatively small operation, and presumably they get financial support from charitable donations and like-minded religious organizations. But if they got accreditation, they wouldn't be small any more -- their enrollment would soar immediately. And their losses would soar along with their enrollment.

    Everyone loves the idea of getting something for nothing. Unfortunately, it's not a realistic business model.
    Those are all questions for those schools to answer, and while I can't say what Nations approach to it will be, University of The People appears to have already addressed some of those issues through application fees, exam fees, and donor sponsorship for disadvantaged students. Learning material costs are also eliminated through online-based texts (Nations also does some of this as well). So, say you live in the U.S. and you finish an Associate degree through them, you're looking at about $2,000 in exam fees and perhaps $4,000 for a Bachelor's degree, provided you took every course through them without transfer credits. Not too bad.

    In this way, no one would be getting something for nothing. The student would be getting a degree at an incredibly affordable price, and the school would be bringing in money to maintain itself, at least that's how it would work for wealthier nations. In less wealthy nations, most students would be getting a degree basically for free; I'm totally okay with that.

  18. #16
    CalDog is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,647
    Those are all questions for those schools to answer, and while I can't say what Nations approach to it will be, University of The People appears to have already addressed some of those issues through application fees, exam fees, and donor sponsorship for disadvantaged students.
    University of the People, like Nations, is presently a small operation. The following numbers are from "University of the People: the First Three Years", p. 32:

    New students enrolled, 2009-10: 489
    New students enrolled, 2010-11: 461
    New students enrolled, 2011-12: 361

    So they only enroll around 400 new students per year. Like Nations, they probably aren't covering their expenses with tuition and fees; they make it up with charitable donations ("donor sponsorship"). That's fine for a small operation.

    But what would the numbers be like if UoPeople had recognized US accreditation ? Probably bigger, right ?
    How much bigger ? Seems like the potential global market for an accredited American degree with free tuition could be rather large.
    So thousands of new students per year ? Tens of thousands ? Hundreds of thousands, like U of Phoenix ?

    I think UoPeople enrollments -- and expenses -- would soar if the school had recognized accreditation.
    I'm just not convinced that donor support -- which is what makes the free tuition model possible -- would soar at the same rate.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2013 at 11:36 PM.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 11 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Breaking News!!!
    By NMTTD in forum Off-Topic Discussions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-21-2013, 04:08 PM
  2. Capella University WITHDRAWS their APA Accreditation Application
    By APerson in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-13-2006, 11:48 AM
  3. Breaking News: tenured Prof will soon get fired!
    By Orson in forum Off-Topic Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-07-2005, 05:05 PM
  4. any news about Taft's DETC accreditation?
    By Jonathan Liu in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-25-2002, 08:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15