+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 38

Thread: PhD(c)?

  1. #1
    edowave is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,613

    PhD(c)?

    Recently I've started noticing a rise in "PhD(c)" popping up at the end of peoples names, usually on websites trying to sell you something.

    Unless you were looking for an academic or research position, you almost never saw this. Even then, it was rare. People outside academia (and many inside) have no idea there is a difference between a "PhD" and a "PhD(c)."

    Some of these 'candidates' will have the font size of the 'c' comically smaller than the other letters. A few even insist on being addressed as doctor.

    Is it just me, or does anyone find this misleading?
    BS, MS, PhD - University of Florida
    MBA - Heriot-Watt University
    Penn Foster - Home Remodeling and Repair (currently)
    Edinburgh Business School East Coast Alumni Ambassador

  2. #2
    Randell1234 is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    7,645
    I think it is wrong and misleading. When I was applying for adjunct positions I would put "PhD (ABD) .....expected graduation date 2010" and be clear that I was not done.

  3. #3
    Maniac Craniac is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    punoɹɐ ƃuıƃuɐɥ ʇsnɾ
    Posts
    5,635
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by edowave
    A few even insist on being addressed as doctor.
    Since many foreign doctorates are dissertation-only (Ph.D by research), could I not say that I am Ph.D(c)?
    Last edited by Maniac Craniac; 01-09-2011 at 02:06 PM.
    BA, Social Sciences ---- Thomas Edison State College

    Chuck Norris doesn't call the wrong number. You answer the wrong phone

  4. #4
    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Silicon Valley, California, USA
    Posts
    2,362
    Quote Originally Posted by edowave View Post
    Recently I've started noticing a rise in "PhD(c)" popping up at the end of peoples names, usually on websites trying to sell you something.

    Unless you were looking for an academic or research position, you almost never saw this. Even then, it was rare. People outside academia (and many inside) have no idea there is a difference between a "PhD" and a "PhD(c)."

    Some of these 'candidates' will have the font size of the 'c' comically smaller than the other letters. A few even insist on being addressed as doctor.

    Is it just me, or does anyone find this misleading?
    Examples from websites?
    Dave, Ph.D.

    http://www.facebook.com/wagnerdave/

  5. #5
    major56 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wagner View Post
    Examples from websites?
    Here’s some …

    Myra Goldman, PhD(c), ARNP, FNP-BC — University of Louisville

    Dino Samartzis, PhD(C

    CV: Anita Dempsey MSN, APRN, BC, PhD (c)

    Diana Mason, PhD, C, FAAN, RN — Hunter College

    Simmons Success: Clare Safran-Norton, PT, PhD(c), MS, MS, OCS

    http://pt.unlv.edu/CVmerrill.pdf

    Mark Phillips PhD (C) - LinkedIn

    Alex Diaz, PhD(c), LCSW, Clinical Social Work/Therapist, Tuckahoe, NY 10707 | Psychology Today's Therapy Directory

    Jennifer Merrilees, RN, PhD-C | Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)

    Per Wikipedia: "A PhD program candidate, or PhDc (sometimes called Candidate of Philosophy), is a postgraduate student at the doctoral level who has successfully satisfied the requirements for doctoral studies, except for the final thesis or dissertation. As such, a PhDc is sometimes called an "ABD" (All But Dissertation or All But Defended)." Doctor of Philosophy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Answers.com - What is a PhDc
    Major56
    ___________________________________
    M.B.A., West Texas A&M
    M.Ed., Prairie View A&M
    Command and General Staff School, U.S. Army Command & General Staff College
    B.B.A., Sam Houston State

  6. #6
    StefanM is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,352
    This would be a good situation for the rarely-used C.Phil. credential.

  7. #7
    TEKMAN is offline Semper Fi!
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Keller, Texas
    Posts
    3,302
    In the book Graduate Savvy by Jeff Green, PhD; he recommends put neither PhD (ABD) nor PhD(c). Anyway, this book is required for the first class at Capella University . Frankly, I think the book is useless because half of the book is talking what we discuss in this forum. And about 20% is talking about Capella University along. The book costs about $40.00; and it waste of money.
    Ph.D | Nova Southeastern University (Est. 2017)
    MPS | Georgetown University (2012)
    MS | Southern Methodist University (2010)
    BS | Troy University (2006)
    Cert | Marine Corps Institute (2008)
    -------------------------www.CyberfiSecurity.com------------------------

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    Tireman 44444 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    679
    Quote Originally Posted by Maniac Craniac View Post
    Since many foreign doctorates are dissertation-only (Ph.D by research), could I not say that I am Ph.D(c)?
    I was told that I could not use anything (not even when I have successfully defended and told I have the ok by my committee) until I have the diploma in hand. Now, I do have PhD (Ongoing) and no one has said anything to me yet.
    BA-History-North Carolina Wesleyan College
    MA-History-North Carolina Central University
    MLS-North Carolina Central University
    PhD-History (ongoing)-University of South Africa

  10. #9
    distancedoc2007 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    229
    I'm superstitious about this, and won't be listing anything until I am really sure I am done and approved. Why tempt fate? PS. Loved MC's comment about being ABD right from the first day of a dissertation-only doctorate! That thought had occurred to me also...

  11. #10
    John Bear is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Northern California.
    Posts
    5,667
    It is legendary, and true, that more than a few people, on their business cards (mostly Asia and Africa) have stated, "University of London, B.A. (failed)." Same with doctorates. I was told (but could not quickly find examples) that the term "Ph.D.(f)" has been used. My brief search did find lots of comments on this matter, such as this from an Argentine scholar about his job application:

    "My opponent had failed to earn a doctorate, but had made the attempt in the right place. The failure at the University of Oxford had more merit to succeed at the University of Buenos Aires or La Plata. During a visit to India I was able to confirm the hypothesis that it is better to fail in the right place to succeed in inappropriate. There I met several people who left me their business cards in which, under the name, read, "Ph. D. (failed) Oxford" or "failed PhD" in Oxford. Presumably, this failure had opened many doors."

  12. #11
    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Silicon Valley, California, USA
    Posts
    2,362
    Quote Originally Posted by major56 View Post
    Per Wikipedia: "A PhD program candidate, or PhDc (sometimes called Candidate of Philosophy), is a postgraduate student at the doctoral level who has successfully satisfied the requirements for doctoral studies, except for the final thesis or dissertation. As such, a PhDc is sometimes called an "ABD" (All But Dissertation or All But Defended)." Doctor of Philosophy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Remember, Wikipedia is just for fun and has not been systematically edited by subject matter experts...

    That said, since the public doesn't really understand what a Ph.D. is, it is hard to know whether a uniform or distinctive nomenclature for the Ph.D. Candidate is an issue worth worrying about:

    1) Assertion: "So and so is a Ph.D. Candidate!" Response: "Wow, what is that? That's not a medical doctor; is it?"
    2) Assertion: "So and so is a Ph.D.!" Response: "Wow, what is that? That's not a medical doctor; is it?"

    See, outside of higher education and journal articles nobody really cares or understands... :)
    Last edited by Dave Wagner; 01-10-2011 at 03:43 PM.
    Dave, Ph.D.

    http://www.facebook.com/wagnerdave/

  13. #12
    ITJD is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    903
    If a person puts Ph.D on their CV and they are really a Ph.D(c) then that is misleading.

    If a person is a Ph.D(c) and they put that on their CV, that's truth.

    If people don't know the difference that's ignorance.

    Another thread successfully solved :)
    MSIA(c) - Northeastern University
    MBA - Isenberg School of Management - University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    BSIT- Western Governors' University
    BA History - Northeastern University

  14. #13
    major56 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wagner View Post
    Remember, Wikipedia is just for fun and has not been systematically edited by subject matter experts...

    That said, since the public doesn't really understand what a Ph.D. is, it is hard to know whether a uniform or distinctive nomenclature for the Ph.D. Candidate is an issue worth worrying about:

    1) Assertion: "So and so is a Ph.D. Candidate!" Response: "Wow, what is that? That's not a medical doctor; is it?"
    2) Assertion: "So and so is a Ph.D.!" Response: "Wow, what is that? That's not a medical doctor; is it?"

    See, outside of higher education and journal articles nobody really cares or understands... :)
    Dave,

    As you’ve noted … it’s not necessarily a significant issue, unless one has completed the doctorial course requirements and is completing the dissertation. Nonetheless, per Acronym Finder: PhDc is an abbreviation for PhD program candidate. Correct or incorrect … some use PhD(c) /PhDc. However, is there really dissimilarity in using PhD (ABD) vs. PhD(c) or PhDc? I do appreciate the resume or CV disclosure used /suggested by Randell, e.g. “…expected graduation date…”
    PhDc - PhD program candidate
    Major56
    ___________________________________
    M.B.A., West Texas A&M
    M.Ed., Prairie View A&M
    Command and General Staff School, U.S. Army Command & General Staff College
    B.B.A., Sam Houston State

  15. #14
    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Silicon Valley, California, USA
    Posts
    2,362
    Quote Originally Posted by major56 View Post
    Dave,

    As you’ve noted … it’s not necessarily a significant issue, unless one has completed the doctorial course requirements and is completing the dissertation. Nonetheless, per Acronym Finder: PhDc is an abbreviation for PhD program candidate. Correct or incorrect … some use PhD(c) /PhDc. However, is there really dissimilarity in using PhD (ABD) vs. PhD(c) or PhDc? I do appreciate the resume or CV disclosure used /suggested by Randell, e.g. “…expected graduation date…”
    PhDc - PhD program candidate
    My personal opinion is that the best way is to just state the designation without abbreviation: Ph.D. Candidate. Including the expected graduation date is probably not meaningful because it is not accurate.

    If the person wants to elaborate, then do so in parenthesis and then drop the completed dissertation on the interviewer's desk. For example, Ph.D. Candidate (Dissertation completed Fall 2010, but Committee Chairman refused to sign the dissertation or articulate his objections to the research.) Let the interviewer draw conclusions about what happened. It isn't necessary to state those facts verbatim.
    Last edited by Dave Wagner; 01-11-2011 at 08:07 AM.
    Dave, Ph.D.

    http://www.facebook.com/wagnerdave/

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    GeeBee is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    185
    A relative of mine has "BS Mathematics (candidate)" on her resume. She thinks it sounds better than "dropout."

    My own resume simply has, in the Education section: "Louisiana Tech University, 1976 - 1979." I'll be happy when I can add a degree.

  18. #16
    StefanM is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,352
    Quote Originally Posted by GeeBee View Post
    A relative of mine has "BS Mathematics (candidate)" on her resume. She thinks it sounds better than "dropout."
    Is that accurate, though? I would think that if you withdraw from a school, you are no longer in candidacy.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15