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  1. #1
    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Cheapest PhD program

    Hi I am currently looking for a PhD program in psychology or PsyD. Does anyone know of schools or institutions that have tuitions that are not so expensive?

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    Randell1234 is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Hi I am currently looking for a PhD program in psychology or PsyD. Does anyone know of schools or institutions that have tuitions that are not so expensive?
    What do you consider expensive? Are you looking for a PsyD to get licensed? Cal Southern has a PsyD for $295 per credit but they are not acceditied. Does that help?

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    japhy4529 is offline House Bassist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Hi I am currently looking for a PhD program in psychology or PsyD. Does anyone know of schools or institutions that have tuitions that are not so expensive?
    If you are not looking to become licensed, and cost is an issue, then I suggest that you look at foreign schools. For example, University of South Africa (UNISA) offers a PhD in Psychology available via distance learning.
    Tom
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  4. #4
    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Hi I am currently looking for a PhD program in psychology or PsyD. Does anyone know of schools or institutions that have tuitions that are not so expensive?
    There aren't any cheap psychology schools that are regionally-accredited, so here are some California-based unaccredited schools:

    2nding Randell's suggestion of California Southern's (www.calsouthern.edu) as being both interesting and inexpensive... they have a Master's degree that leads to MFT licensure.

    You might have a look at Newport's Ph.D. psychology program, which is cheap at $170.00 per unit but I don't know anything about the quality: http://www.newport.edu/fees.html

    Ryokan College (www.ryokan.edu) is more expensive but pushes Psy.D. students toward licensure.

    Western Institute for Social Research (www.wisr.edu) has a Ph.D. in Social Change and an MFT that leads to licensure. Not exactly what you are looking for but I've always like this school.

    Remember, there is sometimes a relationship between price and quality, but nearly always a relationship between price and utility.
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    BillDayson is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Hi I am currently looking for a PhD program in psychology or PsyD. Does anyone know of schools or institutions that have tuitions that are not so expensive?
    You might want to take a look at full-time on-campus programs.

    The more selective universities often provide financial aid packages to many (sometimes all) of their doctoral students and these can include free tuition and in some cases up to $30K/year financial stipend. Students are expected to work for their departments as research and/or teaching assistants, activities that are treated as part of the doctoral program. Most of UC Berkeley's doctoral programs do this and many other universities do it too.

    So it's possible to find free doctoral programs out there, if you don't have family responsibilities and don't worry about lost wages that could have been earned doing something else. It can be a very good deal for younger people, but admission to these things is usually highly competitive.

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    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Wow that is cheap but is it a recognizable school that wont be frowned upon by employers when seeking employment?

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    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    There are some schools who are extremely expensive such as Pacifica and The Chicago school or USC but would they al have the same quality because of the cost per unit? Appreciate your help. Thanks.

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  9. #8
    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillDayson View Post
    You might want to take a look at full-time on-campus programs.

    The more selective universities often provide financial aid packages to many (sometimes all) of their doctoral students and these can include free tuition and in some cases up to $30K/year financial stipend. Students are expected to work for their departments as research and/or teaching assistants, activities that are treated as part of the doctoral program. Most of UC Berkeley's doctoral programs do this and many other universities do it too.

    So it's possible to find free doctoral programs out there, if you don't have family responsibilities and don't worry about lost wages that could have been earned doing something else. It can be a very good deal for younger people, but admission to these things is usually highly competitive.
    Bill I have looked into some of these univ but they are rather discouraging since they only take in a limited few and are extremely competitive. I plan to apply but would like to have a back up plan in the event I am not accepted and other alternatives are rather pricey....

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    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Wow that is cheap but is it a recognizable school that wont be frowned upon by employers when seeking employment?
    If you are referring to my thoughts on unaccredited newport.edu, then, no, it is not a recognized school that will provide you with the foundation for a full career as a psychologist . However, I believe that Ryokan (and CalSouthern?), although unaccredited, can prepare you for licensure in California and may be suitable if you are switching careers or have some other reason to pursue an unaccredited doctorate; remember, that unaccredited schools, no matter how good, will not be accepted in many (or most) situations.

    If you want a full career as a psychologist , apply to the regionally accredited and APA accredited schools, and borrow the money. That's the only way.
    Dave, Ph.D.

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    emichele20 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wagner View Post
    If you are referring to my thoughts on unaccredited newport.edu, then, no, it is not a recognized school that will provide you with the foundation for a full career as a psychologist . However, I believe that Ryokan (and CalSouthern?), although unaccredited, can prepare you for licensure in California and may be suitable if you are switching careers or have some other reason to pursue an unaccredited doctorate; remember, that unaccredited schools, no matter how good, will not be accepted in many (or most) situations.

    If you want a full career as a psychologist, apply to the regionally accredited and APA accredited schools, and borrow the money. That's the only way.
    Good advice. Please also remember that if you are considering licensure you have to check with your state to see if they will accept regionally and or nationally accredited schools. Some will not even accept online schools and in my state of Pennsylvania they will not even consider you for licensure if you have not attended an APA approved school. As it was mentioned above most of the schools APA schools do have a tough admissions process but atleast you can have peace of mind knowing that you will be able to get licensed and get a job when done.

    Check out this site for license requirements by state: http://www.asppb.net/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3343
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  12. #11
    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wagner View Post
    If you are referring to my thoughts on unaccredited newport.edu, then, no, it is not a recognized school that will provide you with the foundation for a full career as a psychologist . However, I believe that Ryokan (and CalSouthern?), although unaccredited, can prepare you for licensure in California and may be suitable if you are switching careers or have some other reason to pursue an unaccredited doctorate; remember, that unaccredited schools, no matter how good, will not be accepted in many (or most) situations.

    If you want a full career as a psychologist, apply to the regionally accredited and APA accredited schools, and borrow the money. That's the only way.
    Dave, I have looked into APA accredited schools, however not regionally accredited, can you fill me in on that a little more and where I can get more info in regards to which schools are regional accredited. Can a school have both accredidations or is it one or the other? Some schools like Alliant which I thought was a mill school is APA accredited so I am unsure what to think about that and some UC schools are not APA accredited. So there is a great mix. Someone told me it may be because the program has not been around long enough to get accredited. Also, as far as the job market goes, any idea how PsyD are being accepted? I'd rather go with a PhD but I am wondering since I see that a lot of schools are offering that.

  13. #12
    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by emichele20 View Post
    Good advice. Please also remember that if you are considering licensure you have to check with your state to see if they will accept regionally and or nationally accredited schools. Some will not even accept online schools and in my state of Pennsylvania they will not even consider you for licensure if you have not attended an APA approved school. As it was mentioned above most of the schools APA schools do have a tough admissions process but atleast you can have peace of mind knowing that you will be able to get licensed and get a job when done.

    Check out this site for license requirements by state: http://www.asppb.net/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3343
    I think that is my biggest fear with choosing a school. Going to a school and not being able to find a job when done and have a high amount of loans pending because of the high cost of the school. I am really looking for the degree in psychology that will have the most avail job opportunities than the others.

  14. #13
    emichele20 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Dave, I have looked into APA accredited schools, however not regionally accredited, can you fill me in on that a little more and where I can get more info in regards to which schools are regional accredited. Can a school have both accredidations or is it one or the other? Some schools like Alliant which I thought was a mill school is APA accredited so I am unsure what to think about that and some UC schools are not APA accredited. So there is a great mix. Someone told me it may be because the program has not been around long enough to get accredited. Also, as far as the job market goes, any idea how PsyD are being accepted? I'd rather go with a PhD but I am wondering since I see that a lot of schools are offering that.
    Go to http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/doctoral.html This is the site where APA regionally accredited schools are located. I currently work for the federal government and as long as you have a doctorate in the field, have attend and APA approved school and internship you are good to go. The only online school that is APA approved is fielding.edu but there are alot of sessions that you will have to travel to if out of state. Its okay if you dont have a family with young ones like myself :).
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  15. #14
    Dave Wagner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wondering View Post
    Also, as far as the job market goes, any idea how PsyD are being accepted? I'd rather go with a PhD but I am wondering since I see that a lot of schools are offering that.
    The other part of your question was handled, so I'll pontificate on this section...

    The Psy.D. is aimed more at practitioners. I read quite a few social and personality psychology listserves and will offer the opinion that Psy.D. holders are not trained as completely to be researchers and are somewhat looked down upon by tenured professors. Overall, you would think one who has earned a Ph.D. in a Psychology discipline would understand the cognitive dangers of megalomania, but it seems not...
    Dave, Ph.D.

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  17. #15
    Wondering is offline Registered User
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wagner View Post
    The other part of your question was handled, so I'll pontificate on this section...

    The Psy.D. is aimed more at practitioners. I read quite a few social and personality psychology listserves and will offer the opinion that Psy.D. holders are not trained as completely to be researchers and are somewhat looked down upon by tenured professors. Overall, you would think one who has earned a Ph.D. in a Psychology discipline would understand the cognitive dangers of megalomania, but it seems not...
    My goal is to pursue a career either with the federal government, the state, or a hospital. In the future I would like to consider teaching as a possibility but it is not my only concern. So when looking at these schools, none are really close to home, the price tag is either high or really high. And PsyD seemed to be offered more than Phds now so it makes me wonder it they will be more acceptable in the future. PsyD programs are not as competitive because I pressume that they are offered more and are not funded. Can anyone with a career in Psychology already or knowledgeable with such stats fill me in regarding he reality of getting a job with a PsyD or PhD accredited or not accredited....Thanks

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