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  1. #1
    Tom
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    Question Touro International University/Touro College

    Does anyone have any feedback regarding Touro International University?

    It appears that TIU (Non-Residential Program) has a solid regionally accredited program at a reasonable cost. Most US Doctoral (PH.D. Business/Public Administration ) cost between $37-40K (Nova, Union, Capella , UofPh, and Walden.), Touro’s tuition cost $21K if one has met all of the required prerequisites and those who have graduated from a non-business degree, the cost would be $30k. (16 credit hours for prerequisite courses) Also, there is no cost for books since they are provided on the Net, which allows an additional savings between $2-3K.

    Although, the school is a branch of Touro College, TIU is a new institution that could be on the leading edge in providing PH.D’s. when comparing it to the other similar/alike US D.L. colleges/universities.
    http://www.tourouniversity.edu/

    Tom

    D.B.A. Argosy University (In-Progess)
    M.P.A. Nova Southeastern University
    B.S. Bus. Adm. Florida Metropolitan University


  2. #2
    Eli
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    Thumbs up

    That is correct. TUI is regionally accredited and a branch campus of the brick and mortar Touro College.

    I found both the MBA and Ph.D. programs to be excellent. Highly recommended!

    Search for "Touro" in this forum to find other threads discussing the same issue.

    Good luck.
    Eli



  3. #3
    thekingster is offline Registered User
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    Post

    Originally posted by Tom:
    Does anyone have any feedback regarding Touro International University?

    It appears that TIU (Non-Residential Program) has a solid regionally accredited program at a reasonable cost. Most US Doctoral (PH.D. Business/Public Administration ) cost between $37-40K (Nova, Union, Capella , UofPh, and Walden.), Touro’s tuition cost $21K if one has met all of the required prerequisites and those who have graduated from a non-business degree, the cost would be $30k. (16 credit hours for prerequisite courses) Also, there is no cost for books since they are provided on the Net, which allows an additional savings between $2-3K.

    Although, the school is a branch of Touro College, TIU is a new institution that could be on the leading edge in providing PH.D’s. when comparing it to the other similar/alike US D.L. colleges/universities.
    http://www.tourouniversity.edu/


    Hello Tom,
    I am currently finishing my MBA through Touro (2 semesters to go!) I have spoken to many who are enrolled in their doctoral programs and the testimony is always positive. Since TUI is relatively new I doubt sufficient market saturation exists to adequately determine the utility of a Touro PhD.

    Only two broad categories exist for attaining a PhD: business and health sciences.

    If you elect to go with Touro you will find a competent faculty and challenging workload. If I can answer any questions with greater specificity please email me at s_lking@charter.net.

    Regards,
    Steven King
    BA - Bethany University
    MBA - Touro University International (Trident)
    MEd - Grand Canyon University.
    Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in HIM - Regis University
    Registered Health Information Administrator

  4. #4
    DaveHayden is offline Registered User
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    TUI is definately a creditable choice. Any one familair with the history of TUI? I believe TC is a Jewish Studies College from New York. Did TUI develop out of TC or seperate and then join with TC to gain acreditation? Thanks for your help.

    ------------------
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden

    "Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare



  5. #5
    Eli
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    Originally posted by DaveHayden:
    TUI is definately a creditable choice. Any one familair with the history of TUI? I believe TC is a Jewish Studies College from New York. Did TUI develop out of TC or seperate and then join with TC to gain acreditation? Thanks for your help.

    TUI is a branch campus of Touro College but it is physically located in another state. Under California law, they must be authorized by California (not New York) to award their degrees. Thus, there is a legal requirement for TUI to award its own degrees. Middle States (one of the 6 RA agencies) thoroughly reviewed and approved this relationship.

    Eli


  6. #6
    Eli
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    Originally posted by DaveHayden:
    I believe TC is a Jewish Studies College from New York.
    I quote from TC's web site:

    "Touro College is a Jewish-sponsored independent institution of higher and professional education , founded by Dr. Bernard Lander. The College was established primarily to enrich the Jewish heritage, and to serve the larger American community. About eight thousand students are currently enrolled in the various schools and divisions of Touro.

    The College derives its name from Judah and Issac Touro, leaders of colonial America, who represented the ideals upon which the College bases its mission. Inspired by the democratic ethos enunciated by George Washington at Newport, Rhode Island when he visited Touro Synagogue in 1790, the Touro family provided major endowments for universities, the first free library on this continent, community health facilities in the United States, and pioneering settlements in Israel.

    Touro was chartered by New York State in 1970. In 1971 the college opened with a class of 35 Liberal Arts and Sciences students. Since 1971, the College has demonstrated dynamic growth. A Women’s Division was added to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Schools of General Studies, Law and Health Sciences were subsequently organized. The College organized sister institutions in Israel and Russia. The School for Lifelong Education , offering a non-traditional mentored-based program, was organized in Fall 1989.

    The College experience, however consists of more than classroom instruction. Touro seeks to foster an atmosphere of warmth, in which close faculty-student relationships, student camaraderie and individualized attention are nurtured in many ways. "
    www.touro.edu

    Student body approx.: 10,000

    Eli


  7. #7
    Mike Albrecht is offline Registered User
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    It is interesting that a school located in California is accrediated by an east coast accrediting body because the parent campus is in NY, and this is acceptable. What an amazing accredidation system we have in this country!

    Originally posted by Eli:
    TUI is a branch campus of Touro College but it is physically located in another state. Under California law, they must be authorized by California (not New York) to award their degrees. Thus, there is a legal requirement for TUI to award its own degrees. Middle States (one of the 6 RA agencies) thoroughly reviewed and approved this relationship.

    Eli


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  9. #8
    DaveHayden is offline Registered User
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    Hi Eli

    Thanks for the qoute from the web page. I had read that in the past but it kind of ignores how and why TUI came to be created in CA and why it is associated with TC. I did come across some AED posting from Dr John Bear and other regulars that were interesting. I am still unclear about the specific origin of TUI. Many thanks.

    ------------------
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden

    "Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare



  10. #9
    Tracy Gies is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by DaveHayden:
    Hi Eli

    Thanks for the qoute from the web page. I had read that in the past but it kind of ignores how and why TUI came to be created in CA and why it is associated with TC. I did come across some AED posting from Dr John Bear and other regulars that were interesting. I am still unclear about the specific origin of TUI. Many thanks.

    I think that TUI was established in California because NY law does not allow an institution of higher learning to call itself a university unless it offers at least five different and distinct PhD programs.

    TUI wanted to be allowed to call itself a university because of its international outreach. In many many countries, the term "college" denotes a level of education below that of a university.

    I think someone had posted here or at AED that officials at TUI say they chose California specifically because of infrastructure. They found everything they needed to run a virtual university at facility in California.

    In any case, TUI is fully accredited and I plan to apply for admission to the the next MBA class starting in March. For those of us in the U.S. military, the TUI MBA is an even better deal than it is for most. TUI offers an in-house tuition assistance plan which covers all tuition costs not covered by military tuition assistance. Combine that with no cost for textbooks, and you have a cost-free MBA .

    Tracy<><
    Tracy Gies<><
    B.S., Individualized Studies, Charter Oak State College, 2001
    M.A., Administration (with concentration in Communication Arts) , University of the Incarnate Word, 2005

    [SIZE=1][I]The fifth lesson I teach is intellectual dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. It is the most important lesson, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. The expert makes all the important choices; only I, the teacher, can determine what you must study, or rather, only the people who pay me can make those decisions which I then enforce...Curiosity has no important place in my work, only conformity...We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know how to tell themselves what to do. It's one of the biggest lessons I teach. [/I][/SIZE] [SIZE=1][B]--From "The Seven-Lesson School Teacher," by John Taylor Gatto, the 1991 New York State Teacher of the Year.[/B] [/SIZE]

  11. #10
    thekingster is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by Tracy Gies:
    facility in California.

    For those of us in the U.S. military, the TUI MBA is an even better deal than it is for most. TUI offers an in-house tuition assistance plan which covers all tuition costs not covered by military tuition assistance. Combine that with no cost for textbooks, and you have a cost-free MBA .

    Tracy&lt;&gt;&lt;
    Well, it's virtually cost-free. We military students still have to pay the $75 application fee. But hey, an accredited MBA for $75? That's a bargain in ANYONE's book.

    Steven King
    BA - Bethany University
    MBA - Touro University International (Trident)
    MEd - Grand Canyon University.
    Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in HIM - Regis University
    Registered Health Information Administrator

  12. #11
    Eli
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    Originally posted by DaveHayden:
    Hi Eli

    Thanks for the qoute from the web page. I had read that in the past but it kind of ignores how and why TUI came to be created in CA and why it is associated with TC. I did come across some AED posting from Dr John Bear and other regulars that were interesting. I am still unclear about the specific origin of TUI. Many thanks.

    I sugget you email them directly. They are very responsive.

    Eli

  13. #12
    Eli
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    Originally posted by steven_king:
    Well, it's virtually cost-free. We military students still have to pay the $75 application fee. But hey, an accredited MBA for $75? That's a bargain in ANYONE's book.

    Steven King
    I agree with Steven and Tracy. It is definitely a GREAT advantage for military personnel.

    On a different subject, I noticed that the student body is increasing at a very good rate too. Starting with 250 students in 1999 and reaching 2600 in mid 2001.

    http://www.touro.edu/alumni/updates/newsjune2101.asp


    "Touro University International, based in Los Angeles, has secured approval as a DANTES (Defense Activity for Non Traditional Support) university; this will entitle military students enrolled in TUI programs to federal Tuition Assistance. The College of Business Administration at TUI now has official accreditation from the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education . Provost Yoram Neumann reports that TUI now has over 2,600 students enrolled in its business and health science programs. "


    Eli

  14. #13
    Tracy Gies is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by steven_king:
    Well, it's virtually cost-free. We military students still have to pay the $75 application fee. But hey, an accredited MBA for $75? That's a bargain in ANYONE's book.

    Steven King
    That's right. I forgot about the initial outlay of $75.00.

    Those of us in the military will be able to one-up the "Joneses" when they brag about paying off their new car loan early: "Well, that's pretty good nieghboor, but I paid for my entire MBA with one check, and still had plenty of money left over for Christmas presents."

    I had mentioned this in another thread, but I think it is worth mentioning again: TUI is set apart from other virtual universities by the fact that it is non-profit. That is relevant because it should allow TUI to escape much of the criticism aimed at other virtual universities which are, without exception, for-profit ventures. Many fear, rightly or otherwise, that for-profit colleges and universities will cut too many corners in order to increase their profits, to the detriment of their students.

    Tracy&lt;&gt;&lt;
    Tracy Gies<><
    B.S., Individualized Studies, Charter Oak State College, 2001
    M.A., Administration (with concentration in Communication Arts) , University of the Incarnate Word, 2005

    [SIZE=1][I]The fifth lesson I teach is intellectual dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. It is the most important lesson, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. The expert makes all the important choices; only I, the teacher, can determine what you must study, or rather, only the people who pay me can make those decisions which I then enforce...Curiosity has no important place in my work, only conformity...We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know how to tell themselves what to do. It's one of the biggest lessons I teach. [/I][/SIZE] [SIZE=1][B]--From "The Seven-Lesson School Teacher," by John Taylor Gatto, the 1991 New York State Teacher of the Year.[/B] [/SIZE]

  15. #14
    aa4nu is offline Registered User
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    &gt;Does anyone have any feedback regarding &gt;Touro International University?

    Just completed my 3rd session of their
    MBA program. As others have posted, I too
    am very well satisfied with the program.

    Research the previous posts on this
    subject for more details. Be glad to
    try and answer any related questions.

    Billy Cox
    aa4nu@ix.netcom.com

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  17. #15
    DaveHayden is offline Registered User
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    "That is relevant because it should allow TUI to escape much of the criticism aimed at other virtual universities which are, without exception, for-profit ventures. "

    That is actually a completely incorrect statement. The big three are non-profit schools. In fact they are State Colleges which for the most part are a step of above private Colleges. Also it seems TUI is the profit generating arm of TC. Of coarse since TUI is a part of TC it is not a virtual university but the virtual division of a standard College. Many State, Non-profit, and For-profit Colleges have virtual divisions. That said a tuition-free MBA is a very nice perk for those in the military. I still would appreciate any info on reasons and motivation behind the creation of TUI. It seems to have grown out of the San Francisco College of Osteopathic Medicine. An interesting if unique beginning.

    ------------------
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden
    Best Regards,
    Dave Hayden

    "Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare



  18. #16
    Tracy Gies is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by DaveHayden:
    "That is relevant because it should allow TUI to escape much of the criticism aimed at other virtual universities which are, without exception, for-profit ventures. "

    That is actually a completely incorrect statement. The big three are non-profit schools. In fact they are State Colleges which for the most part are a step of above private Colleges. Also it seems TUI is the profit generating arm of TC. Of coarse since TUI is a part of TC it is not a virtual university but the virtual division of a standard College. Many State, Non-profit, and For-profit Colleges have virtual divisions. That said a tuition-free MBA is a very nice perk for those in the military. I still would appreciate any info on reasons and motivation behind the creation of TUI. It seems to have grown out of the San Francisco College of Osteopathic Medicine. An interesting if unique beginning.

    Perhaps my statement was a little too broad or unclear. I had in mind U of Pheonix, JIU, and Capella when I wrote that. While U of Pheonix is not on-line only, it is, nevertheless, for-profit. I believe that JIU and Capella are on-line only, as well as for-profit.

    So, TUI should escape much of the criticism that has been aimed at U of Pheonix, JIU, and Capella because they are for-profit ventures.

    I am not sure what the "big three " to which you refer are.

    As far as TUI being the profit generating arm of TC, this is what Professor Yoram Neumann, TUI's Provost and Chief Academic Officer said in regards to a recent tuition reduction at TUI:

    "Remember that Touro University International is a not-for-profit educational institution, we have an obligation to meet our cost structure and provide for future developments with our tuition. However, we are not obligated to keep those tuition rates at a level to also provide a substantial profit element. We can pass those savings on to our students. We do not need to provide for stockholders or other investors."

    While TUI may be a primary source of revenue for TC, it is not a source of profit, and you are not likely to hear officials at Capella , U of Pheonix, and JIU say that they don't have to provide for investors.

    Tracy&lt;&gt;&lt;

    Tracy Gies<><
    B.S., Individualized Studies, Charter Oak State College, 2001
    M.A., Administration (with concentration in Communication Arts) , University of the Incarnate Word, 2005

    [SIZE=1][I]The fifth lesson I teach is intellectual dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. It is the most important lesson, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. The expert makes all the important choices; only I, the teacher, can determine what you must study, or rather, only the people who pay me can make those decisions which I then enforce...Curiosity has no important place in my work, only conformity...We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know how to tell themselves what to do. It's one of the biggest lessons I teach. [/I][/SIZE] [SIZE=1][B]--From "The Seven-Lesson School Teacher," by John Taylor Gatto, the 1991 New York State Teacher of the Year.[/B] [/SIZE]

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