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Thread: BA to PhD?

  1. #1
    cookderosa is offline Resident Chef
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    BA to PhD?

    I spoke to a friend who is a professor at NYU. She teaches food studies, and has her PhD in history . (we went to culinary school together).

    I specifically talked to her about my master degree plans. She asked if I thought about a PhD, I explained that being double digit years away- and that I really hadn't given it much thought. She suggested skipping a masters and going right into a PhD program. I was caught off guard, because I always thought the typical road was to build on the masters first. She indicated that the felt a masters might be a waste of money, especially if I intended to complete it online, which is not taken seriously.

    (let me add, that I "get" that the top tier of the college pyramid is till quite a bit snobby and most of the old guard are not aware at just how much impact online education is making as a whole. Harvard has online degrees- the dominoes are falling and there really is no going back..... but, I don't really agree or disagree with her assessment. I can only say that I am not aiming to teach in the top tier of the higher education pyramid- so the point is moot.)

    I think for me, a PhD is out of the question, since I can only attend school part time (and on line)..... but what do you guys think about this subject in general? Who here skipped the masters? Why? For those who have a masters and PhD, what do you think about the whole suggestion?
    Jennifer
    MS Applied Nutrition, Canisius College
    AA & BA Social Science, Thomas Edison State College
    AOS Culinary Arts, Culinary Institute of America

  2. #2
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
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    I'm curious whether your friend doesn't take these online graduate programs seriously:

    http://www.scps.nyu.edu/online/options.jsp?stOLType=GR

    Anyway, yes, at many schools you can do a PhD without a Master's, but you have to do the same number of total credits, so there's really not much advantage to it. It's like doing a Bachelor's without doing an Associate's -- sure, you can do it that way, but it's no faster.

    Incidentally, there are PhD programs one can do part time and online, with varying levels of respectability. Since you said your goal isn't the tier one tenure track (me either), they may be right for you.

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    sentinel is offline Registered User
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    If a masters degree will serve your purposes, there is no need to put yourself under the pressure of a doctoral degree. Once you have a masters degree though your opinions for further study towards a doctoral degree broaden since you can choose between the traditional North American style of coursework plus dissertation or the European style of research-based doctoral degree (dissertation only).

    I agree with Steve's observations.
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    edowave is offline Registered User
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    In the liberal arts world, online degrees are not taken seriously. I think that is one reason why there are so few online history degrees, compared to about a million online MBAs.

    But yes, a PhD without a master's is common. At some schools, you can only apply for a PhD program. If you don't make it, you are given the Master's as a sort of consolation prize.
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  5. #5
    TEKMAN is offline Semper Fi!
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookderosa View Post
    I spoke to a friend who is a professor at NYU. She teaches food studies, and has her PhD in history . (we went to culinary school together).

    I specifically talked to her about my master degree plans. She asked if I thought about a PhD, I explained that being double digit years away- and that I really hadn't given it much thought. She suggested skipping a masters and going right into a PhD program. I was caught off guard, because I always thought the typical road was to build on the masters first. She indicated that the felt a masters might be a waste of money, especially if I intended to complete it online, which is not taken seriously.

    (let me add, that I "get" that the top tier of the college pyramid is till quite a bit snobby and most of the old guard are not aware at just how much impact online education is making as a whole. Harvard has online degrees- the dominoes are falling and there really is no going back..... but, I don't really agree or disagree with her assessment. I can only say that I am not aiming to teach in the top tier of the higher education pyramid- so the point is moot.)

    I think for me, a PhD is out of the question, since I can only attend school part time (and on line)..... but what do you guys think about this subject in general? Who here skipped the masters? Why? For those who have a masters and PhD, what do you think about the whole suggestion?
    Well, I agree with all the replies above; most of the schools required the same number of credits. Such as Northcentral University, 81 without a Master, and 51 with a Master for Doctoral degree.

    Why don't you apply to Northcentral and and opt out to a Master if you decide not to continue for Ph.D in the half way.

    I would do the same, but it looks odd for me because I am just 24 years old, and I need more work experience...then goin' for Ph.D. Therefore, I am taking the Master degree route first.
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  6. #6
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
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    Quote Originally Posted by edowave View Post
    In the liberal arts world, online degrees are not taken seriously. I think that is one reason why there are so few online history degrees, compared to about a million online MBAs.
    I think it's the reverse: that there are many online MBAs and few online graduate programs in History because a lot more people want an MBA than an MA in History . As for online degrees not being taken serious in the liberal arts world, come on, that's a totally ridiculous generalization. I'm sure, for example, that people would take someone perfectly seriously who'd studied online for a PhD in Classical Civilization from the University of Florida .

    -=Steve=-
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    CoachTurner is offline Registered User
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    Regarding online being taken seriously:

    It really has come around to the reputation of the school offering the degree. Online coursework is so prevalent now that the method of delivery is no longer the real issue -- it's all about the school awarding the degree. (my opinion of course and possibly my next research endeavor)

    As for history vs MBA ; I'm going to agree with Steve and go on to say too that there are probably more in-the-seat programs for MBAs than there are history too. This is a supply and demand issue. More students want an MBA than want an MA in History . Silly students...
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  9. #8
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by edowave View Post
    In the liberal arts world, online degrees are not taken seriously. I think that is one reason why there are so few online history degrees, compared to about a million online MBAs.
    Last time I counted, there were something on the order of about 304 online MBA degrees and 17 online MA degrees in History . That said, the issue is not so much that liberal arts departments aren't taking online degrees seriously but rather that university administrators believe there to be greater demand for MBA degrees than for MA degrees in History .
    Theo the Educated Derelict
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  10. #9
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoachTurner View Post
    More students want an MBA than want an MA in History. Silly students...
    You got that right!
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  11. #10
    samkoyejo is offline Registered User
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    BA to PhD?

    Well i think going direct to PhD isnt a bad idea at all.
    Its will save you cost and gain you more recognition in the academic field.
    Many academics always end up going for the apex degree i.e.PhD.

    In my opinion ...BA to Phd does make a lot of sense for your time and pocket book.
    BSc. Business ('08)

  12. #11
    cookderosa is offline Resident Chef
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    Quote Originally Posted by samkoyejo View Post
    Well i think going direct to PhD isnt a bad idea at all.
    Its will save you cost and gain you more recognition in the academic field.
    Many academics always end up going for the apex degree i.e.PhD.

    In my opinion ...BA to Phd does make a lot of sense for your time and pocket book.
    >>

    Thanks for all the suggestions so far.
    hummmm.... it's really a lot to think about.
    Jennifer
    MS Applied Nutrition, Canisius College
    AA & BA Social Science, Thomas Edison State College
    AOS Culinary Arts, Culinary Institute of America

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