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  1. #1
    intsvc is offline member
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    PhD or DSc for IT?

    Hi

    For IT qualifications, is a PhD or DSc seen highest in a commercial environment?

    Kind regards

  2. #2
    Jack Tracey is offline Registered User
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    I do not wish to speak for others but before answering I would want to know the following:
    1) What is your own idea about the differentiation of the cited nomenclature?
    2) What schools are we talking about? A PhD from where? A DSc from where? If you're interested in making such fine distinctions in nomenclature, I'm not at all certain that you can separate the degree from the school.
    Just my thoughts.
    Jack

  3. #3
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Not sure. But you might get some better answers by posting this on our IT subforum.
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  4. #4
    intsvc is offline member
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    Originally posted by Jack Tracey
    I do not wish to speak for others but before answering I would want to know the following:
    1) What is your own idea about the differentiation of the cited nomenclature?
    2) What schools are we talking about? A PhD from where? A DSc from where? If you're interested in making such fine distinctions in nomenclature, I'm not at all certain that you can separate the degree from the school.
    Just my thoughts.
    Jack

    1) A PhD is a research degree, ideally done by those looking for a place in Education . A DSc is a practical and research degree, ideally done by those looking for a place in private business.

    2) UMIST in Manchester (http://www.manchester.ac.uk/) do them.

  5. #5
    JamesK is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by intsvc



    1) A PhD is a research degree, ideally done by those looking for a place in Education . A DSc is a practical and research degree, ideally done by those looking for a place in private business.

    2) UMIST in Manchester (http://www.manchester.ac.uk/) do them.
    Traditionally, a DSc is a higher degree, ranking above a PhD by definition.

    The University of Manchester considers the DSc to be a higher degree (pdf, page 3).

    Where did you come up with your definition of the difference between the two degrees, and where did you see that Manchester offers the DSc as a "practical and research degree"?

  6. #6
    gasbag is offline Registered User
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    From schools in the USA, the two degrees are exactly equivalent (presuming that the DSc or ScD is earned rather than honorary).

  7. #7
    intsvc is offline member
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    Originally posted by JamesK


    Traditionally, a DSc is a higher degree, ranking above a PhD by definition.

    The University of Manchester considers the DSc to be a higher degree (pdf, page 3).

    Where did you come up with your definition of the difference between the two degrees, and where did you see that Manchester offers the DSc as a "practical and research degree"?
    I probably got it wrong then, the definitions were my personal opinion based on what I've read elsewhere on this board and alt.education .distance.

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  9. #8
    Jack Tracey is offline Registered User
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    So if you're correct in regards to the definitions of these degrees (I think it varies a bit from country to country, school to school) it would seem to be a fairly easy choice on your part. What is your goal, education or industry?
    Jack

  10. #9
    intsvc is offline member
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    Originally posted by Jack Tracey
    So if you're correct in regards to the definitions of these degrees (I think it varies a bit from country to country, school to school) it would seem to be a fairly easy choice on your part. What is your goal, education or industry?
    Jack
    I'm in IT and Telecommunications, with alot of Administration.

    I want to do some form of consultancy work, primarily in the private sector with maybe some Education work

  11. #10
    Jack Tracey is offline Registered User
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    Assuming that you are correct with those definitions (there seems to be some question) then it would seem to make the most sense that you pursue the DSc. I'd advise you to check with the specific schools before making application.
    Jack

  12. #11
    DesElms is offline Registered User
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    Originally posted by intsvc
    I probably got it wrong then, the definitions were my personal opinion based on what I've read elsewhere on this board and alt.education.distance.
    Rely on nothing you read at the usenet newsgroup alt.education.distance.

    Originally posted by intsvc
    I'm in IT and Telecommunications, with alot of Administration.

    I want to do some form of consultancy work, primarily in the private sector with maybe some Education work.
    Then what you're really looking for is something that will appropriately impress. Nothing beats a "PhD" for that. Just as the typical joe walking down the street doesn't know "regional" accreditation from any other kind, most people will actually be less immediately familiar with a "D.Sc" or a "Sci.D" (or whatever other designation the doctoral degree has) than a "PhD." Get the PhD and be done with it.
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  13. #12
    intsvc is offline member
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    Originally posted by DesElms
    Rely on nothing you read at the usenet newsgroup alt.education.distance.

    Then what you're really looking for is something that will appropriately impress. Nothing beats a "PhD" for that. Just as the typical joe walking down the street doesn't know "regional" accreditation from any other kind, most people will actually be less immediately familiar with a "D.Sc" or a "Sci.D" (or whatever other designation the doctoral degree has) than a "PhD." Get the PhD and be done with it. [/B]
    Thanks for your feedback.

  14. #13
    seanst is offline Registered User
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    A Ph.D and a D.Sc are no different except that the Ph.D is centered on basic research doctoral and the D.Sc is an applied research doctoral.

    Read more about the D.Sc information here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Science

    Read more about Ph.D
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ph.D.

    Sean
    CISM, CISSP, CBCP, NSA IAM/IEM, C|EH, MCSE+Security, Security+, Network+, iNet+, ITIL

  15. #14
    RFValve is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by intsvc View Post
    Hi

    For IT qualifications, is a PhD or DSc seen highest in a commercial environment?

    Kind regards
    Don't worry much about the degree name but the school that grants the degree. A DSc from Dakota state would be better than a PhD from NorthCentral mainly because the first one is a non-for profit brick and mortar institution with many years in business that won't raise any eye brows while the second one is an online school with little time in business.

    If you want your degree for a commercial environment, most employers can care less if you have a PhD on the first place since IT is not about your degree but IT skills and knowledge. I rather hire a person with no degree but with many Microsoft certifications and years of experience than a PhD with no certifications and experience.

    The only place a PhD can make a difference is for research positions with the government or large companies. For these positions, normally a PhD from a less institution such as the ones available by distance won't really help much since most of these places are looking for graduates from better schools.

    In few words, I wouldn't bother with a distance PhD if your intentions are to get better work in industry. I would use that time to get the skills in demand. Don't forget that most of the PhD programs won't train you in IT but in research skills. PhDs train you on how to conduct research and write papers.

    If your intentions are to teach on the side, a good master's in more than enough. If you want a teaching in the long term, avoid virtual schools since they are not very well accepted still, get a PhD or a doctorate from a bullet proof school with solid reputation.

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