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  1. #1
    miguelstefan is offline Registered User
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    What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    If you could please indulge me for a second, I would like to know what would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title for a person who has not passed a bar exam?

    Should it be,

    John Doe,
    Dr. John Doe,
    John Doe, JD
    or
    John Doe, J.D.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by miguelstefan
    If you could please indulge me for a second, I would like to know what would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title for a person who has not passed a bar exam?

    Should it be,

    John Doe,
    Dr. John Doe,
    John Doe, JD
    or
    John Doe, J.D.

    Thanks in advance.
    Either John Doe, JD or John Doe, J.D. would be correct usage. Attorneys do not use the title "Dr." in reference to their JD. Up till the 1960s, the law degree was the LlB - a second bachelor's. Above the JD degree are the LlM and the JSD. If a lawyer refers to himself/herself as "Dr.", then likely he/she has the JSD (or some other doctorate). There seems to be some prohibition in the legal code of ethics on referring to onesself as "Dr." in reference to the JD.
    Theo the Educated Derelict
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  3. #3
    Rich Douglas is offline Registered User
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    Re: Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by Ted Heiks
    Either John Doe, JD or John Doe, J.D. would be correct usage. Attorneys do not use the title "Dr." in reference to their JD. Up till the 1960s, the law degree was the LlB - a second bachelor's. Above the JD degree are the LlM and the JSD. If a lawyer refers to himself/herself as "Dr.", then likely he/she has the JSD (or some other doctorate). There seems to be some prohibition in the legal code of ethics on referring to onesself as "Dr." in reference to the JD.
    Unless you're Pat Robertson, the presidential assassin. He's referred to as "Dr. Pat Robertson" on his new diet drink. No reference is made to the fact that he is a J.D. (Yale).

    Dirty trick from an evil man.

  4. #4
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
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    Re: Re: Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by Rich Douglas
    No reference is made to the fact that he [Pat Robertson] is a J.D. (Yale).
    Really? Does he have a doctorate in theology, too? Or no? I used to be quite awed by the good Rev. Dr. Pat Robertson while in my teens and twenties. And I always assumed that his doctorate was in theology, not law. Some of his comments (assassinate Chavez, blow up Foggy Bottom) sometimes make me wonder about him, but I still think he's got a pretty good school. Might go there if I need a (new) dl master's in (business), education , or theology. Same goes for the Rev. Dr. Jerry Falwell. Good school, but occasional questionable comments (e.g., causes of 9/11).
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  5. #5
    decimon is offline Registered User
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    Re: Re: Re: Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by Ted Heiks
    Really? Does he have a doctorate in theology, too? Or no? I used to be quite awed by the good Rev. Dr. Pat Robertson while in my teens and twenties. And I always assumed that his doctorate was in theology, not law. Some of his comments (assassinate Chavez, blow up Foggy Bottom) sometimes make me wonder about him, but I still think he's got a pretty good school. Might go there if I need a (new) dl master's in (business), education, or theology. Same goes for the Rev. Dr. Jerry Falwell. Good school, but occasional questionable comments (e.g., causes of 9/11).
    New York Theological Seminary (Master degree) according to the Wikipedia entry. In fact, his education seems quite good.

  6. #6
    nosborne48 is offline Registered User
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    Elsewhere, I pointed out that if YALE UNIVERSITY says I'm a doctor, then I absolutely AM a doctor.

    Now, you're telling me the GOD HERSELF (via her well-known spokesperson Rev. Pat Robertson) also says that I am a doctor!

    I tell you, Dr. Douglas, you are LOSING this one! :D Can't you come up with some really solid authority your (our) position??
    Nosborne48
    J.D. University of New Mexico
    LL.M. In Taxation, Taft Law School
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    (For all the good it does me!)

  7. #7
    little fauss is offline Registered User
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    Isn't it "John Doe, Aschloch?"
    Last edited by little fauss; 08-27-2005 at 11:13 AM.

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  9. #8
    Anthony Pina is offline Registered User
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    Re: Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by Ted Heiks
    Either John Doe, JD or John Doe, J.D. would be correct usage. Attorneys do not use the title "Dr." in reference to their JD. Up till the 1960s, the law degree was the LlB - a second bachelor's. Above the JD degree are the LlM and the JSD. If a lawyer refers to himself/herself as "Dr.", then likely he/she has the JSD (or some other doctorate). There seems to be some prohibition in the legal code of ethics on referring to onesself as "Dr." in reference to the JD.
    Interestingly, it is not uncommon for college faculty who teach outside of law schools to be referred to as "doctor". I have known business and humanities faculty with JDs refer to themselves regularly as "doctor", particluarly those who teach for community colleges. I have never known a law professor who uses the title "doctor".
    Anthony Piña, Ed.D.
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  10. #9
    miguelstefan is offline Registered User
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    Thumbs up

    Thank You Sirs,

    For your timely and clear resposes.

  11. #10
    little fauss is offline Registered User
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    Re: Re: Re: What would be the proper usage of the Juris Doctor title?

    Originally posted by Anthony Pina


    Interestingly, it is not uncommon for college faculty who teach outside of law schools to be referred to as "doctor". I have known business and humanities faculty with JDs refer to themselves regularly as "doctor", particluarly those who teach for community colleges. I have never known a law professor who uses the title "doctor".
    That's very true; it's just the title "doctor" is more familiar in the business and humanities department, and lawyers technically (and IMO, "technically" only) possess a "doctorate". That said, I know of one law professor of mine who was referred to as "doctor" regularly.

    Of course, he had a PhD in history in addition to a J.D. :)

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