+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 28
  1. #1
    nobycane is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    214

    Question Degree initials after name?

    I did a vague search on this issue first and came up limited, so I will start a newer thread.

    When is it proper to use your degree level initials after your name in a professional manner?
    For example, it is very common for individuals whom have obtained their doctorate (Ph.D.) to use the abbreviations after their name (ie: John Q. Public, Ph.D.)...especially in the academic world.

    However, is it common to use a graduate degree after your name, such as a Master's level? (ie: John Q. Public, M.A.)

    I have seen individuals use both B.A./B.S., M.A./M.S. as their title and seems a bit unusual.

    My educational institution is implementing a new procedure in making educational business cards to hand out to students and parents...and their is an option to mark bachelor's, master's or doctorate level.

    What are you opinions on this issue?
    2011: M.S., Geoscience (Miss St U) -- In progress
    [08-10] grad work, C&I, (Montana St U)
    2007: M.S., Science Edu, (Montana St U)
    2004: B.S., Geography (Excelsior College)

  2. #2
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Ottawa County, Ohio
    Posts
    11,601

    Re: Degree initials after name?

    Originally posted by nobycane
    I did a vague search on this issue first and came up limited, so I will start a newer thread.

    When is it proper to use your degree level initials after your name in a professional manner?
    For example, it is very common for individuals whom have obtained their doctorate (Ph.D.) to use the abbreviations after their name (ie: John Q. Public, Ph.D.)...especially in the academic world.

    However, is it common to use a graduate degree after your name, such as a Master's level? (ie: John Q. Public, M.A.)

    I have seen individuals use both B.A./B.S., M.A./M.S. as their title and seems a bit unusual.

    My educational institution is implementing a new procedure in making educational business cards to hand out to students and parents...and their is an option to mark bachelor's, master's or doctorate level.

    What are you opinions on this issue?
    Degree ettiquette says that one can sign onesself "John Doe, PhD" or "John Doe, MBA " or whatever (assuming John Doe actually has the degrees he claims) when acting in a capacity in which the field of expertise of one's degree is relevant. One does not sign onesself "John Doe, PhD" when writing a letter to the editor of your local paper ... unless you have a PhD in World Affairs.

    In your case, since the question involves mentioning your degree on educational business cards prepared by your school, you would be perfectly justified in claiming your degrees earned (as degrees in progress, if noted as such).
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  3. #3
    me again is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,357
    As a cop, I don't use my academic title. But when I teach, I do.

    2014 - Bench pressed 43 pounds
    2013 - Promoted to fries operator (at McDonalds)
    2010 - CPR, finally passed after 5th try
    2001 - Post High School, Microsoft Powerpoint, magna cum laude
    1998 - 12th grade, voted most likely to succeed
    1997 - 11th grade wood shop class, summa cum laude
    1989 - 3rd grade soccer, 6th place trophy

  4. #4
    Guest
    As a cop I didn't use my academic title, but who wants to be arrested by mdoneil BS MIS?

    As a nurse I didn't use my academic title, but I used my licensure mdoneil RN.

    As a librarian I try not to sign stuff.

  5. #5
    DesElms is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Northern California and/or Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    2,860
    Originally posted mdoneil's signature:
    Very seldom posting to degreeinfo because of nuts and shills that have made it as bad as AED.
    How do you figure that? Just curious.
    Gregg L. DesElms
    [size=1][i]A lowly barnacle on the
    hull of the S.S. DegreeInfo[/i][/size]

    [size=1][b][i]Raising digression, tangential thinking and
    circumlocution to an absolute artform.[/b][/i][/size]

    Veritas nihil veretur nisi abscondi.
    Veritas nimium altercando amittitur.

    [size=1][b]USEFUL LINKS:[/b]
    [b]*[/b] Pop-up currency converter, [url=http://www.xe.com/pca/launch.cgi?FromSelect=EUR&ToSelect=USD
    ][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Articles you should not miss, [url=http://www.degreeinfo.com/articles.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Books you should not miss, [url=http://tenspeedpress.com/catalog/tenspeed/item.php3?id=2127][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://www.degreemills.com][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Web sites you should not miss, [url=http://www.geocities.com/liu_jonathan/distance.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://bain4weeks.com][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Get foreign degrees evaluated, [url=http://www.aacrao.org/credential/index.htm][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and/or [url=http://naces.org/members.htm][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Read all about accreditation and degree mills, [url=http://www.chea.org/degreemills/][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Check school/program accreditation, [url=http://chea.org/search/search.asp][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://ope.ed.gov/accreditation/Search.asp][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Obtain international accreditation information, [url=http://www.inqaahe.org/members_view_all.cfm?mID=3&sID=22][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Making post (and other) times display correctly, [url=http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=21247][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] DegreeInfo's Terms of Service (TOS) agreement, [url=http://www.degreeinfo.com/terms_policies.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].

    [url=http://www.liberaloasis.com/][color=darkblue][b]LIBERAL OASIS[/b][/color][/url][/size]

  6. #6
    Lerner is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brighton Beach, NY and London, UK
    Posts
    2,184
    Well,

    I think it deferes from country to country.
    Take UK for example, there people list their degrees and memberships, once a person becomes member of IEE they can use
    MIEE designation after their name, CEng is registere with UK EC and also people use degree title in their email signature.

    I think in Israel the same a degree is great honor and on email, professional letters one states his degree after his name.

    In US I think it's more for Ph.D, Dr and many professional titles such as MD, JD, RN, PE etc.

    Learner MSEE, MSIT , PE ;-)

  7. #7
    Mr. Engineer is offline member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,063
    In the high tech field, a BS degree is usually the minimum. I have never seen anyone put that on their business card. The oddest one I saw was a Plasma Physicist who put PhD, CCNA, and MCP (even though their job had nothing to do with IT). I had a boss at one company use his certified commercial real estate certification on his business card (previous job - everyone thought it was really odd).

    I plan to put MBA on my business card once I finish the course. My brother who is a Chippie has his title (Sgt and then MPA ) on his official business card. My bosses now use dual titles Dr. and PhD.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    friendorfoe is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    The River Styx
    Posts
    2,095
    Generally the only experience I have had with people using letters after their name BS degree and lower has involved professional certification...such as A+, Network+, MCSE , MCP or the like.

  10. #9
    jimwe is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    124
    I saw someone who had "MOB" after their name. What is that? Did they graduate from Mafia U?

  11. #10
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Ottawa County, Ohio
    Posts
    11,601
    Originally posted by jimwe
    I saw someone who had "MOB" after their name. What is that? Did they graduate from Mafia U?
    Master of Organizational Behavior?
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  12. #11
    Guest
    Originally posted by DesElms
    How do you figure that? Just curious.
    My lack of turning it off presently. Six or eight months ago I was more assured of it.... but now it seems to have settled down. I don't mind divergent opinions (in fact I enjoy divergent opinion I find that divergent opinion challenges my beliefs and that is the only way I may change my opinions or beliefs).

    There was a bunch of nonsense arguing going on at that time. I usually remove the tick mark from show signature now.... but apparently it is time to correct my signature.

  13. #12
    Bruce is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    7,542
    Originally posted by me again
    As a cop, I don't use my academic title. But when I teach, I do.
    I don't, in either situation.

    As a cop, I'm known as "Officer Tait", but when I teach, I insist on being addressed as "Bruce". Since I address my students by their first name, why should I be exempt?
    --
    Bruce Tait
    A.S. (Criminal Justice) Quincy College
    B.A. (Criminal Justice) Curry College
    M.A. (Criminal Justice) University of Massachusetts-Lowell
    M.A. (Forensic Psychology) Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology



    RA Criminal Justice Degrees by Distance Learning - Updated 3/16/08

    NA Criminal Justice Degrees by Distance Learning - Updated 3/20/08

  14. #13
    PatsFan is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    379
    In the mental health field I see masters degrees and doctorate initials after names, but rarely bachelors degrees. In Massachusetts oftentimes it's just one's license these days, but often its both degree and license:

    "MSW , LICSW" or just "LICSW."

    Tom
    BA, Nyack College
    MAR, Eastern Nazarene College
    MSW, University of Connecticut
    D.Min., Ashland Theological Seminary

  15. #14
    DesElms is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Northern California and/or Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    2,860
    Originally posted by mdoneil
    I don't mind divergent opinions (in fact I enjoy divergent opinion I find that divergent opinion challenges my beliefs and that is the only way I may change my opinions or beliefs).
    Now that's refreshing: Someone who not only gets how it's supposed to work, but appreciates -- ne, embraces -- it. We're of one mind on this.

    Originally posted by mdoneil
    There was a bunch of nonsense arguing going on at that time. I usually remove the tick mark from show signature now.... but apparently it is time to correct my signature.
    Ah, now I understand. Cool.

    Actually, that's a very good way, now that you call my attention to it, to give readers your status if you take a hiatus from this place. I keep forgetting that whatever one keys-in to one's signature is reflected in all of one's posts, past and present. In other words, the signature does not freeze in time in an old post like the post itself does. If one changes one's signature, it is reflected at the bottom of posts even three or four years ago.

    So, for example, if a person were to sign-off from here for a while to, for example, concentrate on his dissertation for a while, he could say so in his signature so that even when people see something he posted a long time ago they would be able to see that he's not around much anymore and, therefore, anything written in response may not get read or further responded to.

    Interesting. And useful. See? Ya' learn (or, at the very least have called to your attention) something new every day. Thanks.
    Gregg L. DesElms
    [size=1][i]A lowly barnacle on the
    hull of the S.S. DegreeInfo[/i][/size]

    [size=1][b][i]Raising digression, tangential thinking and
    circumlocution to an absolute artform.[/b][/i][/size]

    Veritas nihil veretur nisi abscondi.
    Veritas nimium altercando amittitur.

    [size=1][b]USEFUL LINKS:[/b]
    [b]*[/b] Pop-up currency converter, [url=http://www.xe.com/pca/launch.cgi?FromSelect=EUR&ToSelect=USD
    ][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Articles you should not miss, [url=http://www.degreeinfo.com/articles.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Books you should not miss, [url=http://tenspeedpress.com/catalog/tenspeed/item.php3?id=2127][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://www.degreemills.com][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Web sites you should not miss, [url=http://www.geocities.com/liu_jonathan/distance.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://bain4weeks.com][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Get foreign degrees evaluated, [url=http://www.aacrao.org/credential/index.htm][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and/or [url=http://naces.org/members.htm][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Read all about accreditation and degree mills, [url=http://www.chea.org/degreemills/][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Check school/program accreditation, [url=http://chea.org/search/search.asp][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url] and [url=http://ope.ed.gov/accreditation/Search.asp][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Obtain international accreditation information, [url=http://www.inqaahe.org/members_view_all.cfm?mID=3&sID=22][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] Making post (and other) times display correctly, [url=http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=21247][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].
    [b]*[/b] DegreeInfo's Terms of Service (TOS) agreement, [url=http://www.degreeinfo.com/terms_policies.html][color=darkblue]here[/color][/url].

    [url=http://www.liberaloasis.com/][color=darkblue][b]LIBERAL OASIS[/b][/color][/url][/size]

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    nosborne48 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Las Cruces NM
    Posts
    3,970
    Health care folks NEED to use their degree abbreviations when signing work related stuff because the degree initials can convey a lot of useful information to the reader. Putting "M.D." after a physician's signature is not done to impress the reader or gratify the physician. It's done to convey that the writer is a physician and trained, and empowered, to decide and do certain important things. That's th best rule, I think. No one should attempt to use a degree abbreviation just to impress, IMHO.

    But BOY do they ever! Especially in Education (sorry Dr. Pina)!

    Now, when discharging particular professional duties, the signer may be required to demonstrate his professional authority. "John Smith, C.P.A." MUST sign annual statements concerning the entities he audits WITH his title. (But not, mind you, with his M. Acc . degree)

    Lawyers sign pleadings with a statement identifying whom they represent, i.e. "John Smith, Attorney for the plaintiff Fred Jones" but usually avoid "Attorney at Law" and almost ALWAYS avoid "J.D." Again, the designation is used to convey significant information rather than to impress the reader.
    Nosborne48
    J.D. University of New Mexico
    LL.M. In Taxation, Taft Law School
    Enrolled Agent and Attorney
    (For all the good it does me!)

  18. #16
    CalDog is online now Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,261

    Mandatory use of titles

    Originally posted by nosborne48
    Now, when discharging particular professional duties, the signer may be required to demonstrate his professional authority...Again, the designation is used to convey significant information rather than to impress the reader.
    In California, Professional Engineers and Professional Geologists are required to use the PE or PG titles. Not just on stamped plans or reports -- they are required to notify clients and potential clients of that fact that they are state-licensed and state-regulated, even before any report is prepared. There are different ways to satisfy the notification requirement; they include using the titles on business cards and correspondence, or displaying license certificates or signs in the office. The regulations even specify what minimum size font you can use (presumably so it is not buried in the fine print).

    For the same reason, you will also see license certificates displayed at the barber shop or hair salon.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15