+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    SurfDoctor is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6,445

    What Code Should I Learn, and Where Should I Study It?

    I'm a teacher who teaches some technology classes, among other things, at a large, private school. I'm feeling it in my bones that I will be asked to teach students how to write code sometime in the next year or two. I know a little about writing in Flash Action Script, plus a tiny bit of writing in HTML, and have been covering that in my classes, but I think I will need to evolve again soon.

    I'm not young and have no interest in a new career as a code writer, web developer, or whatever, but I do want to keep up with the dynamic requirements of teaching Jr. high and high school. What would you suggest I do to keep myself up with the times?

    I see a bunch of interesting courses in JavaScript at Lynda.com and I have always been interested in that. I'm thinking that either JavaScript or HTML5 might be a good choice. Or would things like BASIC, C, C++, COBOL, FORTRAN, Ada, and Pascal be better? Those seem a bit intense for my requirements. The classes I might teach would be focused on exposing students to writing code, not on making them into code writing masters. Suggestions?



    ________________________________
    Last edited by SurfDoctor; 12-05-2015 at 09:12 AM.
    "If ignorance is bliss, why are the ignorant so angry?" Shannon Wheeler

  2. #2
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,709
    I recommend this. You can learn a little bit of different languages for applied projects. And it's free, so if it sucks, no harm no foul.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  3. #3
    jhp
    jhp is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    604
    Python.
    It is relatively easy to grasp.
    It can be used in many areas, desktop, mobile, web, and so forth.
    It is powerful.
    It runs in almost all operating systems.
    There is a large body of free material available.
    There is a large body of supporting community.

  4. #4
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,709
    Code Academy is also a great resource.

    Personally, I recommend using the free resources before spending money on any code training.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  5. #5
    SurfDoctor is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6,445
    Quote Originally Posted by Neuhaus View Post
    I recommend this. You can learn a little bit of different languages for applied projects. And it's free, so if it sucks, no harm no foul.
    That code camp looks pretty good, thanks. I'm not sure I'm up to the 400 to 800 hours of training though. I could probably pull that off this summer, but not during the school year. If they were interested, it looks like this site could take someone all the way through the training and make them capable of landing an entry level coding job.



    ____________________________________
    Last edited by SurfDoctor; 12-05-2015 at 03:21 PM.
    "If ignorance is bliss, why are the ignorant so angry?" Shannon Wheeler

  6. #6
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,709
    Quote Originally Posted by SurfDoctor View Post
    That code camp looks pretty good, thanks. I'm not sure I'm up to the 400 to 800 hours of training though. I could probably pull that off this summer, but not during the school year. If they were interested, it looks like this site could take someone all the way through the training and make them capable of landing an entry level coding job.



    ____________________________________
    I would recommend Code Academy for tinkering during the year. It's self paced. You can come and go as you please. And you can use their in-browser compiler. You can try a few lessons of JavaScript and Python (both solid choices for students, IMHO), see what you like, what you can picture your students doing etc.

    I took a class in BASIC when I was in high school (late 90s). For the time it was horribly outdated and we whined incessantly that we wanted to program in VB. You can still use it, mind you. But remember that your students also have access to these same courses. So the possibility that you'll get some kids who come to you after being primed for Python by Code Academy, Khan Academy or MOOCs is absolutely real. And if they come to the table looking for more Python and you serve them a BASIC soufflé, well, I don't think you'll deliver the desired result.

    Python is also cool because it's pretty useful for almost any occupation. I use Python for analyzing hiring data for our affirmative action and vets 100 reporting. I'm able to do stuff with very large datasets that used to crash excel spreadsheets. So, the doctors, lawyers and HR professionals of the future might benefit from some Python learning whereas teaching anything in the C family might only help those students who are focused on careers centered around code.

    All of that is just my opinion. I'm not a coding expert I just tinker.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  7. #7
    sube is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Neuhaus View Post
    I recommend this. You can learn a little bit of different languages for applied projects. And it's free, so if it sucks, no harm no foul.
    Thanks for recommending this. I need to know this stuff for work. I don't need to be an expert, but I just need to be familiar with the different languages and this really fits the bill.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,709
    Quote Originally Posted by sube View Post
    Thanks for recommending this. I need to know this stuff for work. I don't need to be an expert, but I just need to be familiar with the different languages and this really fits the bill.
    You're welcome. I tinker around with it from time-to-time. I studied HTML briefly back in the day when simple HTML was somewhat useful (in a world before Javascript, mainly). Covering HTML, CSS, Javascript, angular.js and giving you plenty of practice projects I think it's a really neat service. Add to that the fact that it's free and I think it's an easy win.

    Code Academy also allows for some pretty good practice in Python, Javascript, Angular.js and others but they are a bit lighter on project application. Between the two a dedicated person could learn quite a bit without spending a dime.

    I set a personal goal for myself of creating something that is resume worthy in the next five years. Maybe an app that scans your resume for BS buzz words and recommends more meaningful phrases.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  10. #9
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Neuhaus View Post
    Maybe an app that scans your resume for BS buzz words and recommends more meaningful phrases.
    I'd use an app like that but there's no other way to say "Countess of Nigeria."

  11. #10
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,709
    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    I'd use an app like that but there's no other way to say "Countess of Nigeria."
    My personal pet peeve centers around the "word" synergy and its variations.

    Some of my favorites:

    Consistently executed the synergy of company directives.
    Realigned company synergies to leverage and maximize growth opportunities.
    Capitalizing upon organizational synergies, employed numerous synergistic strategies in a bottom-up holistic approach to enhance organic growth.

    What's sad is that job seekers think so little of us that they think this idiocy actually fools us into thinking they are good candidates.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  12. #11
    SurfDoctor is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6,445
    Or they are too dumb to realize how transparent their attempts to snow you are.

    By the way, I've been going through the material at both sites you recommended and they may be the ticket for me. I spent about 20 min at the Code Camp site and learned a fair little bit about writing HTML 5. I may buckle down and go through a lot of the material over my Christmas break from my job. Thanks so much.
    "If ignorance is bliss, why are the ignorant so angry?" Shannon Wheeler

  13. #12
    Johann is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,330
    Quote Originally Posted by SurfDoctor
    COBOL, FORTRAN, Ada, and Pascal...
    I'd not start with any of these four. Not what I'd recommend as a "first" language - especially these days. COBOL was the first programming course I took, but that was nearly 40 years ago. Not much in the way of stunning, blow-away graphics, IIRC.

    I think Python and HTML5 are both great first choices for today. My son teaches these (and others) to high school students. I like Basic, but that's because I'm "old skool" and have tons of Basic legacy code; I saved everything I wrote, back to the early 80s on floppies and I've still got 'em. That old code can be overhauled to run under Windows in any modern screen resolution and colour depth your machine supports, under QB64 (free).

    The course recommendations were great. I wish you every success.

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 12-14-2015 at 02:14 PM.

  14. #13
    Johann is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,330
    Quote Originally Posted by Johann
    COBOL was the first programming course I took, but that was nearly 40 years ago...
    Punch-cards and a freezer-sized DEC "Mini-Computer." It was 1978 and I was a young whippersnapper of only 35. My first-ever college course. Oh, the memories...

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 12-14-2015 at 02:24 PM.

  15. #14
    Davewill is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    190
    Another vote for Python. Since it's interpreted, it's quick and easy to write and run code. Since the formatting is part of the language, everyone writes better looking code from day one. It's also easy to do GUI programming in, and your students won't be impressed (very long) by command line type stuff.

    I would also suggest taking a look at Unity. It's a 3D game development environment that can be scripted using C# or Javascript. Just the kind of thing for those advanced students who want learn about 3D and game programming .

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    SurfDoctor is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6,445
    Another question: What is a decent, free or cheap, HTML5 editor I could use to practice my growing HTML skills? Lots of free ones out there, but I suspect they include a lot of spyware and worse. I need something that I can type in code and see the result, without having to actually upload and publish my code. Can you do that with a browser offline?

    Thanks for the input everyone.



    ___________________________________
    Last edited by SurfDoctor; 01-03-2016 at 04:59 AM.
    "If ignorance is bliss, why are the ignorant so angry?" Shannon Wheeler

Similar Threads

  1. new Straigherline promo code
    By cookderosa in forum CLEP, DANTES, and Other Exams for Credit
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-06-2011, 05:05 AM
  2. new Straigherline promo code
    By cookderosa in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-06-2011, 05:05 AM
  3. Study Skills...Can we learn in our sleep???
    By LJinPA in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 11-21-2004, 10:24 PM
  4. Bible Code
    By AlnEstn in forum Off-Topic Discussions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-18-2003, 11:50 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197