+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 20
  1. #1
    tsimmns92782 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    7

    What's a good IT degree to get

    Besides Compuer Science does it really matter? Will a degree in information technology be looked at better than one in CIS or MIS or just information statements or cyber security? Also, does anyone on here have a degree in CIS from Thomas Edison State College and if so has it helped your career?

  2. #2
    nyvrem is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    520
    i think title don't play as much of a role as compared to the modules you've studied in your degree program.

    just saying.

  3. #3
    tsimmns92782 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    7
    What modules should I be looking for in the program? I know the basic ones are C+, and advanced C+. Do you think the modules from TESC CIS program are quality courses or even the ones for the MIS requirements at Columbia College in MO?

  4. #4
    nyvrem is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    520
    it depends on what you want to do. perhaps you should research the different job fields within IT and see what each of them desire from a college graduate. then u could try to sequence your degree as close to it as possible.

    TESC is good in a sense, it let's you test out many of the classes to hasten your college time. But i'm not sure if the CIS program let's you test out everything. You might want to compare some school's IT programs and see what they offer. You can look into Oregon Tech's online degree in IT, Minot State University's online degree in Management Info Sys, and University of Florida 's online degree in Computer Science . Have a look at the 3 and see how they are different and what they have that are the same. You'll roughly find a 'common core' that all IT practitioners must learn, and then there's the 'specialization' that you can develop on your own.

  5. #5
    TEKMAN is offline Semper Fi!
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    3,691
    Normally in the IT world does not matter, but most employers in my own experience prefer someone with Computer Science major. Especially, in the world of scripting language; python is really favorable for those folks in IT.
    Ph.D| Nova Southeastern University (W/D)
    MPS | Georgetown University (2012)
    MS | Southern Methodist University (2010)
    BS | Troy University (2006)
    Cert | Marine Corps University (2008)

  6. #6
    sanantone is online now Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    2,557
    You can completely test out of TESC's CIS program, but it's not a CIS major. It is a business administration degree with 18 credits in CIS . That is different from majoring in computer science , computer information systems , or information technology . If you don't have any experience in the field or haven't done much self-studying outside of completing your degree, the BSBA in CIS is not going to give you that much computer knowledge. Employers may not care much that you didn't actually major in CIS , but they will care if you don't have much IT knowledge. The federal government usually prefers computer science and engineering over IT and IS degrees.
    Texas State University - PhD CJ (ABD)
    Angelo State University - Master of Security Studies and Grad Cert Terrorism
    Thomas Edison State College/University - BA Soc Sci, AAS in Environmental Safety, ASNSM in Biology, & BSBA in CIS

  7. #7
    tsimmns92782 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for the replies. I really just want a degree and maybe a Masters to be able to apply for the Federal Government jobs at the GS 9 level where you can substitute education for experience. Not that I will even land one, but the degrees would help. I realize Computer Science is the best to have but like Sanatone mentioned engineering might be useful as well. For this I have considered the CS degree at Tesc Or get a degree in anything and then try the online CS degree from OSU. Does anyone have experience from the SOftware engineering degree from ASU . I could go the IT route at AMU, but not sure how much it would help in the job process. I have other training that could always help me with a job doing aircraft maintenance, but eventually want the govt IT jobs. I have also looked at the CIS programs at Columbia College and the MIS degree there also all at Minot State University. I guess I just truly don't know which degree besides the CS Ones would be the best. I would like to avoid CS at this point as most of my previous credits are GE and business so knocking out something fast is my ideal option to be able to check the box.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    tsimmns92782 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    7
    Also, since my degree from my previous B & M school is terrible should I be taking some lower level GE classes that I still need somewhere like Clovis CC or AMU to help the GPA? I'm planning on taking ENGLISH II and Programming I and public speaking along with a science and history this upcoming semester. If I took them at Clovis CC would they be able to transfer to most schools like possibly ASU if I went that route.

  10. #9
    nyvrem is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    520
    I took some ASU computer science classes online. It's assignment based + mid year/final year exams. The exams are done on your own laptop/PC. they will have you install a program that locks your computer so you won't be able to access websites and other programs, and only have access to the exam itself. i'm considering finishing a software engineering degree at ASU since I've already done alot of the lower level credits for their program. but at $500/hour, it's expensive. If you are a florida resident, you can consider UF's online in Computer Science , it's $100/hour for in state and $500/hour for out of state. or University of Illinois @ Springfield, they have a computer science program online. It's $350/hour.

    ASU has a credit evaluation system you can use to check if the courses you take will transfer in.

    https://webapp4.asu.edu/transfercreditguide/app/home

    You submit your course you intend to take from your home college with the syllabus. ASU will get back to you to see what does the course transfer into.
    To graduate from ASU , you need to do 30 credits in residence. So if you can take/find 90 credits of classes outside to do that will transfer in, you can/could cut your cost down.

  11. #10
    RacerBoy is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Munshiganj, Bangladesh
    Posts
    50
    don't have much knowledge about that you written. But I want to know about cyber security. Can someone help me about this.

  12. #11
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    Quote Originally Posted by RacerBoy View Post
    don't have much knowledge about that you written. But I want to know about cyber security. Can someone help me about this.
    If you look at the top of the IT/Computer forum you'll see that we have a lengthy thread on this topic.

    MS "Cybersecurity" Programs?

  13. #12
    Lavendar is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by nyvrem View Post
    I took some ASU computer science classes online. It's assignment based + mid year/final year exams. The exams are done on your own laptop/PC. they will have you install a program that locks your computer so you won't be able to access websites and other programs, and only have access to the exam itself. i'm considering finishing a software engineering degree at ASU since I've already done alot of the lower level credits for their program. but at $500/hour, it's expensive. If you are a florida resident, you can consider UF's online in Computer Science , it's $100/hour for in state and $500/hour for out of state. or University of Illinois @ Springfield, they have a computer science program online. It's $350/hour.

    ASU has a credit evaluation system you can use to check if the courses you take will transfer in.

    https://webapp4.asu.edu/transfercreditguide/app/home

    You submit your course you intend to take from your home college with the syllabus. ASU will get back to you to see what does the course transfer into.
    To graduate from ASU, you need to do 30 credits in residence. So if you can take/find 90 credits of classes outside to do that will transfer in, you can/could cut your cost down.

    Hi! Did ASU use camera for the proctor program (software) besides the lock down browser? Thank you for your reply.

  14. #13
    nyvrem is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by Lavendar View Post
    Hi! Did ASU use camera for the proctor program (software) besides the lock down browser? Thank you for your reply.
    hihi !

    nope, just a lock down on your laptop.

  15. #14
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    This is a bit off-topic but it would be helpful to me (and maybe others) ifsomeone could make a concise summary statement on the distinction between Computer Science and Information Technology as fields of study and careers. There are times when it seems that people use the terms interchangeably and yet Iknow they are not identical. Thanks.

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    Rifleman is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    globe trotter
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    This is a bit off-topic but it would be helpful to me (and maybe others) ifsomeone could make a concise summary statement on the distinction between Computer Science and Information Technology as fields of study and careers. There are times when it seems that people use the terms interchangeably and yet Iknow they are not identical. Thanks.



    The above is pretty useful. EE/CE may develop a piece of hardware, CS may develop a programming language, SE may create software, and IT/IS will implement that technology for an organization's end goals. This is certainly simplified. Can someone with an IT/IS degree end up in a software development role? Yes. But they won't be developing hardware (CE) or designing a compiler (CS). Likewise, a help desk/IT person that resolves issues with your machine at work is unlikely to be a EE/CE/CS/SE.

    A bare minimum CS degree would cover discrete math, data structures, assembly language, operating systems, and algorithms. An IT degree will cover a variety of subjects depending on the institution (not the case for CS), as the term itself is fairly broad. This often covers the latest (hopefully) technology that is being used in the wild. An operating systems course in a CS degree will discuss things like polling, scheduling, memory management, file systems, etc. A similarly titled course in an IT program could cover some of these things, or focus more on using the command line to leverage the operating system's power. Very different types of courses with similar titles.
    Last edited by Rifleman; 08-30-2015 at 10:17 AM.
    He who lets the world, or his own portion of it, choose his plan of life for him, has no need of any other faculty than the ape-like one of imitation.

  18. #16
    novadar is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    633
    Quote Originally Posted by Rifleman View Post
    Can someone with an IT/IS degree end up in a software development role? Yes. But they won't be developing hardware (CE) or designing a compiler (CS). Likewise, a help desk/IT person that resolves issues with your machine at work is unlikely to be a EE/CE/CS/SE.
    Unless said EE/CE/CS/SE degree is not from a "known quantity" institution in the field. Pure Product Development positions recruit from the top institutions (Cal Tech, Stanford, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and others I've left off). You will definitely find EE/CE/CS/SE folks in IS/IT jobs if their program was from Named Directional State University. They will work right along side Liberal Arts majors. My point is that while there nothing wrong with EE/CE/CS/SE majors, don't get one from a school without a name in the industry for those majors. You will be just as well off with MIS/IT or even, heaven forbid, History or Philosophy.
    -------

Similar Threads

  1. Good pairing for Interdisciplinary degree
    By NeedAdvicePlease in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-12-2014, 08:19 PM
  2. Help please! I've been trying for a very good while to find the degree I really need.
    By Deru in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-13-2013, 09:54 AM
  3. Is online Certification or degree really good for IT?
    By edwardlynch in forum IT and Computer-Related Degrees
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-19-2012, 06:11 AM
  4. How good is an Associates degree in America?
    By avia93 in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 01-19-2005, 06:14 PM
  5. A GOOD AFFORDABLE DISTANCE ESL DEGREE?
    By jimwe in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-21-2001, 01:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15