+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 17 to 32 of 61
  1. #17
    Cyber is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    633
    Quote Originally Posted by Love2Learn View Post
    Hi all I am in the last stages of my Bachelors of Arts in Management INformation Systems and I am doing an unpaid internship with a local I.T. Contractor. He is really nice and he told me I should take 2 more cours in networking and security because it will benefit me. I let him know that I wanted to pursue my Masters in Cybersecurity. He told me he wouldn't recommend it because security is always changing...Is this true? Will a Masters in Cybersecurity not be beneficial? He told me networking and security are "hot' as of now.

    Love2Learn, first, let me say that security (both physical and electronic) "ain't going anywhere;" there will always be need for "stuff" to be secured. That said, I have a strong feeling that your boss is suggesting a path that will benefit him or his company immediately (two classes versus one or two years of graduate work). From the perspective of seeking graduate education , you can't be wrong by pursuing something higher than your BS degree; the question really should be in what variant of security.

    First, what you should know is that there is no information systems security program (my use of information security systems here include programs such as cybersecurity, information security , information assurance , computer security, security engineering , electronic security, security management and homeland security with specialisms in information assurance /security etc.) that is complete without atleast one networking class. Second, you need to decide what part of information security you want to specialize in; were you intend to work might help you decide (for example, the federal government values information assurance specialisms more than others although other highly technical areas like cryptography and computer/software engineering security might get you in also).

    If I were in your shoes, I probably will take those two classes that your boss have suggested if you can afford it as part of your BS program, or make sure that the MS degree that you get into include those classes as required courses; the best programs are those certified and termed "Centers of Academic Excellence" by the National Security Agency and the Central Security Service of the United States. Also, since I pay more attention to course content than the program name, I would make sure that the program I ultimately get into is technical in nature not management-inclined. That means course such as cryptography, software application security, telecommunication network security and/or wireless network security must be part of it, in addition to a complete coverage of all 10 ISC2 CBK domains (namely: Access Control, Application Development Security, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning, Cryptography, Information Security Governance and Risk Management , Legal-Regulations -Investigations and Compliance , Operations Security, Physical (Environmental) Security, Security Architecture and Design , and Telecommunications and Network Security).

    I say that because most of the security programs that are not part of a computer science program do not cover all the technical areas, which are very important if you want to remain on the technical side rather than the management side. On more thing: IT contractors, such as your employer, do alot of penetration testing work (also referred to as ethical hacking). That may be the skill set that your boss is angling for your to acquire; I would get a good a ethical hacking book to brush up on the basics or make sure it is part of your present or future program (again, not many programs include it; EC Council offers a certificate worth looking into, if that is an area of interest). Before I talk too much, continue on with your master's degree, in addition to what ever else your present boss tells you. Goodluck with deciding...
    Last edited by Cyber; 06-18-2011 at 12:19 PM.

  2. #18
    Love2Learn is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    35
    Thank you for your in depth post! I greatly appreciate it. I am very confused about going forth with my Masters degree in Cybersecurity because of his comment. I do plan on working for the public sector in the future, so I believe that Cybersecurity would be beneficial to me. I get a little deterred when people make comments like,"What if all computer jobs get outsourced?" or "What if there is another dot com bust or something similar to where computer people are no longer needed?" When people discourage me with these questions I start contemplating on not pursuing the I.T field further. I pursued the I.T. field because I love working with computers but I especially enjoy Network Security.. .. does anyone think that I should be worried about the future. I am 29 right now.??

  3. #19
    Randell1234 is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    7,768
    Quote Originally Posted by Love2Learn View Post
    Thank you for your in depth post! I greatly appreciate it. I am very confused about going forth with my Masters degree in Cybersecurity because of his comment. I do plan on working for the public sector in the future, so I believe that Cybersecurity would be beneficial to me. I get a little deterred when people make comments like,"What if all computer jobs get outsourced?" or "What if there is another dot com bust or something similar to where computer people are no longer needed?" When people discourage me with these questions I start contemplating on not pursuing the I.T field further. I pursued the I.T. field because I love working with computers but I especially enjoy Network Security.. .. does anyone think that I should be worried about the future. I am 29 right now.??
    I would not worry too much. The people to be concerned are the ones in IT that refuse to reinvent themselves with learning new skills. Right now security is the hot ticket. Imagine if someone got their A+ in 1999 when it covered 3.11, W95 and DOS. Imagine if they did not learn NT, 2000, Active Directory, security, etc. What would happen? Listen, IT is here to stay but you have to be willing to keep up with technology. As long as you are fluid and enjoy change, you will stay at the leading edge and be in higher demand.

  4. #20
    Love2Learn is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    35
    Thanks for your response! I will still pursue my Masters in IT or Cybersecurity. I am confident that technology is here to stay as well. I also read the U.S. Government Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and it said Computer Information Systems will be one of the most indemand jobs of the future with the most openings.

  5. #21
    foobessional is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    8
    has anyone heard anything about APU/AMU(American Public/Military University's) Bachelor of Science in Information System Security? Here is a link to their courses for it:
    APU Degree Program: Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Security

  6. Advertisement

  7. #22
    jamesbell is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3
    I am impressed by the quality of information on this thread. There are a lot of good resources here. I am sure I will visit this place again soon.

  8. #23
    Pata5359 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    13
    A Navy buddy of mine is taking up Cybersecurity at UMUC. He's originally from Oklahoma and I told him about a grad certificate Oklahoma State offers online. He's a Sooner fan to the core and hates Okstate.

  9. #24
    ITJD is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    913
    Quote Originally Posted by Randell1234 View Post
    I would not worry too much. The people to be concerned are the ones in IT that refuse to reinvent themselves with learning new skills. Right now security is the hot ticket. Imagine if someone got their A+ in 1999 when it covered 3.11, W95 and DOS. Imagine if they did not learn NT, 2000, Active Directory, security, etc. What would happen? Listen, IT is here to stay but you have to be willing to keep up with technology. As long as you are fluid and enjoy change, you will stay at the leading edge and be in higher demand.
    Well what I'd also add is this.

    The poster needs to decide if he wants to do what he loves, or what will make him money consistently. I will absolutely guarantee two things.

    1. That as you've already said, technology will constantly change and you need to change with it. Those with perpetual degree-seeking disorder will love IT and be alright in it if they feel similarly about IT.

    2. That if a person is like many who got into IT back in the 90s because they could make good money without a solid education underneath them, they're better off going into health care with a cert program and preparing themselves to follow the career trends as they present themselves, IT, Health Care, whatever is next.

    To be fair, I started out as the guy in option two after leaving some rough gigs. Over time I decided to become the guy in option one.
    DBA/PHD - Still reviewing options. Please PM suggestions if desired.
    MBA - Isenberg School of Management - University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    BSIT- Western Governors' University
    BA History - Northeastern University
    Listing technical certifications would be brutal, so I've added up the letters in the initials of the certs and put them back to back.. the total is 113.

  10. #25
    outsourcefirm is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1
    I'm not sure how actual this is, but I've observed certifications in details confidence are usually regarded value more if the location they're provided is outlined as a Middle for Instructional Quality in Information Assurance by the Nationwide Protection Organization.

  11. #26
    Redlining52 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    I am also curious about this program.
    Quote Originally Posted by IT2011 View Post
    Has anyone heard anything about Utica College MS Cybersecurity program. I know that its fairly new. I can't seem to find any detailed information about their program.

  12. #27
    Cyber is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    633
    Bellevue University MS in Cybersecurity attains CNSS accreditation (pdf).

  13. #28
    SuyashJ is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Mumbai, India
    Posts
    1
    Hi, I'm am planning to pursue Masters in Computer Science in the US. I researched for some colleges and found that places like those mentioned in this thread UMUC etc offer MS in Information Assurance .

    I was interested in pursuing MS in Computer Science with specialization as Computer Security. What are the employment opportunities for this currently?

  14. Advertisement

  15. #29
    aoi1988 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    4
    Are there any MS information security /assurance programs out there for people with degrees in non tech related fields and no tech experience? I want to exclude UMUC, their program is not good.

  16. #30
    mcjon77 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by aoi1988 View Post
    Are there any MS information security/assurance programs out there for people with degrees in non tech related fields and no tech experience? I want to exclude UMUC, their program is not good.
    Yes, but you will need to pick up a few certifications first, to qualify. The WGU MSISA requires that you have one of the following:
    1) BS in IT with an emphasis on networking
    2) CISSP or CCNA certification
    3) 3 years IT security experience

    I highlighted number two. While a CISSP certification is impractical for a newbie, a CCNA cert could be awarded to a person with limited tech experience who is willing to study hard. Essentially, you would need to teach yourself networking . It is not as impossible as it sounds. i know many people that taught themselves by going through tutorials and setting up test networks at home.

    The bigger question is whether a person with an MSISA but NO EXPERIENCE could get a job. Personally, I think it would be difficult. It would also be unnecessary, since there are tons of entry level tech jobs (e.g. helpdesk) that don't require masters degrees. For these jobs, you get a few of the basic certs, take the low paying helpdesk/tech support job, and as your experience and certifications increase, you can rapidly move on to higher paying jobs with greater responsibility.

    Eventually, you will "grow into" positions that require you to get a masters degree. In these cases, once you have the masters, you will also have the experience to back it up.
    ALM, Harvard University
    AB, Georgetown University

  17. #31
    SojolHossain is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    4
    This is very nice topic and i want to acquire this degree. Now program is very important things and this program is very need for us. Cyberattacks are being waged all over the world. If anyone want to know about it and get many information about it please follow the link below. (link deleted by moderator)
    Last edited by airtorn; 02-23-2013 at 12:09 PM.

  18. #32
    pvtmahmoud is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    1
    I am interested in an MS in security and would prefer a college that does not have exams. Would prefer projects and papers over proctored exams. I already have a BS in IT and this would have to be an online school. Any ideas?

Similar Threads

  1. Do Doctoral Programs "Teach" Teaching Skills
    By dst10spr97 in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-12-2005, 10:15 AM
  2. KW"E" Called a "Diploma Mill" and a "Sham"
    By Rich Douglas in forum Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approval, and unaccredited schools)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-24-2005, 06:36 AM
  3. Replies: 31
    Last Post: 03-03-2004, 09:36 PM
  4. "Russian Academy of Science" and "World Scientific Association" RJH sites gone
    By galanga in forum Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approval, and unaccredited schools)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-03-2004, 07:21 AM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-28-2003, 04:49 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15